Power paint roller?

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Old 02-19-10, 09:36 PM
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Power paint roller?

I've read several postings from the past year about different types of sprayers and have decided that is not what I want to purchase or even rent due to the overspray issue and "floating paint" into other rooms.

I have a painting nightmare: the large kitchen is 3 colors of yellow, one bedroom is white over pink sponge and was never finished (edges, trim, corners still pink sponged) and also has a hunter green color on the ceiling and about 12" down the walls while the dining room is a deep country blue that apparently had a border along the top wall that has been removed b/c the blue doesn't go all the way to the ceiling.

I bought a 5 gallon can of Valspar high hiding primer to start with. I know this is going to be a labor intensive job but was wondering about purchasing a power roller. I've read some reviews and overall they seem to leak, spit and sputter so maybe it's not worth my money?

Has anyone bought one that actually worked and maybe the bad reviews were "user error" or should I just manually roller it even though that will take me days to finish?

kjh9835
 
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Old 02-20-10, 05:08 AM
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IMO a homeowner type power roller would be a waste of money. They do sell some commercial power rollers but I'm not sure that they are cost effective.

It shouldn't be that big of a job using a conventional roller. You will want another 5 gallon bucket and a roller screen/grid along with a roller pole. The roller pole allows you to roll on the paint without climbing a ladder.Use a good quality 1/2" roller cover. Once you have everything covered up and are ready to start, submerge your roller cover in the paint bucket, roll off some of the excess paint unto the roller screen and your ready to start. Keep your roller cover well lubricated with paint/primer and you will be done in no time

On the prime coat, roll everything you can 1st and do the brush work last [it's quicker that way ] When applying the finish paint, cut in 1 wall/ceiling at a time and then roll it.
 
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Old 02-20-10, 08:20 PM
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I agree that 5 gallons is not much paint to consider using a pressure roller. There is extra set up time and clean up time when using a pressure roller.

I can't vouch for some of the other pressure rollers out there, but I have the Graco PT2000 and three of the Graco telescoping poles (different sizes) for attaching to an airless sprayer.

I have never had a problem with leaking or any other problem with them.

I think for me the starting point would be about 15 gallons (all the same color paint - if you have to change colors - don't bother), anything less I would roll from a bucket.
 
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Old 02-25-10, 04:26 AM
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I've gotten most of the walls clean and started the trim and manual rolling. The DR is almost done. Since we have until the end of March to get moved, I'll just do it all manually instead of wasting $ on a power roller.

Thanks.
kjh9835
 
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