Should I Prime These Spots?

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  #1  
Old 03-14-10, 07:44 PM
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Should I Prime These Spots?

I'm about to paint a couple rooms. The walls have knock-down texture and are currently painted white with a flat sheen.

There are several large areas on the walls with a grayish outline where picture frames and shelves used to hang. These are from the previous owner, and therefore the items which caused the gray outlines will not be put back on the walls.

Would covering or spot-priming these areas with Kilz be a good idea? Or would it do more harm than good by creating a different sheen or thickness where the Kilz/primer was applied?

I'm thinking that two coats of a good quality paint will easily cover this stuff, but I'm not (yet) an experienced painter and would be disappointed if I put two coats down and found than these areas showed through the new paint.

Thanks for any comments or advice.
 
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Old 03-14-10, 08:32 PM
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I myself would prime/seal the whole wall, not just the spots. Actually the whole room. It will ensure no problems with the finish coat and make the finish coat go on better. You could even tint the primer if you need.
 
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Old 03-15-10, 12:40 PM
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Yeah, I tend to assume I'm going to prime the whole wall unless I'm using the same paint which is already there - then I might spot prime
 
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Old 03-15-10, 06:08 PM
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As long as it isn't a stain or caused by oil heat, you shouldn't need to use any primer. Have you tried washing those areas to see what happens?

It's ok to spot prime although the primed areas might cause the latex paint applied over the primer to dry slower than the rest of the wall - no big deal but it scares some folks.
 
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Old 03-16-10, 05:27 PM
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You do need a stain killing primer. If you only spot prime the affected areas then the sheen will vary because the paint will absorb differently on the unprimed surface then the primed surface. If you don't prime at all, then the stains will bleed through. I suggest you prime the entire wall.
 
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Old 03-17-10, 05:14 AM
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"If you only spot prime the affected areas then the sheen will vary"

If you have full coverage with the paint - this will go away once the paint dries. Because the paint will dry slower where the primer is, it will appear shiny for awhile but once dry there shouldn't be any noticeable difference.

If the affected areas are stained then a primer is needed, if it's just dirt/grime, 2 coats of latex finish [without primer] will be fine.
 
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Old 03-18-10, 10:02 PM
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If you have full coverage with the paint - this will go away once the paint dries. Because the paint will dry slower where the primer is, it will appear shiny for awhile but once dry there shouldn't be any noticeable difference.
That is usually not the case when using a stain blocker.

If spot primed with a "non-stain-blocker" (like a drywall Pva primer) you won't have a problem.

Spot primed areas will usually "flash" when using a stain blocker. The flashing results in a higher sheen and a whiter appearance where spot primed. It will continue to look that way through multiple coats.

If you spot prime with a stain blocker, you should do a second coat of primer on the whole wall - if the lighting is good, or you will see flashing.

I don't think a stain blocker is needed at all in this situation. The discoloration around the picture is probably dirt, soot, brownian motion discoloration, or color change from UV light.
 
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Old 03-19-10, 10:59 AM
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Thanks for the replies.

The gray areas appear to be where a metallic frame was hanging on the wall. Either the pressure of the object, or small movements of the object over the years caused some rubbing of the paint. After reading these comments and thinking about it some more, I don't think that stain blocker is required here.

I appreciate the comments about the flash effect when spot priming with a stain-blocker. That's good to know, and I will avoid doing that.

Since my original post, I remembered there is an area of one wall which has new knock-down texture applied to cover a drywall repair. I will have to prime that area for sure with a regular latex primer. I'll probably cover that entire wall with a primer, and maybe the whole room while I'm at it.
 
 

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