How much$$$

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Old 03-15-10, 03:24 PM
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How much$$$

Hi gang, I have a painting job to do for a friend who will not let me just help her out. She insists that she must pay me some money and I would like to know how much a painter would charge to do the following: 1 12x12 bedroom,1 small bath about 6x4, 8 doors, 4 windows and all the trim in her house which if I had to guess was about 300'. I was thinking of charging her half of what a professional painter would charge, this way she's happy for paying me and then i got something also. The reason I don't want to charge her is because she is older and on a limited budget. Thanks
 
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Old 03-15-10, 04:00 PM
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That's a lot of painting and a TON of prep work. I can envision all the taping now. Ugh!

I don't know if the professional painters on here would respond with how much they would actually charge because of the difference in geographical areas, the unknown of the layout, the colors, etc... There is a lot of info missing to give a good estimate.

Just based off of what you said, I would think you charging here $500 would be giving her a huge break. Monster break. Yes, painting is that expensive. At least in this area, you are looking at around $400 a room. That and the trim is very tedious work.

Hopefully one of the painters out there will give a much better opinion.
 
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Old 03-15-10, 06:41 PM
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Welcome to the forums rlyle!

First off I'd never give an estimate site unseen - too easy to get yourself in trouble by either too low a price or too high and never called back.

As riggstad noted there is a lot of needed info missing. Obviously moving furniture [or not] is part of the equation. What color [or color changes, what type of paint [and who is paying for it] and how much prep is needed all play a part.

Do you know how long it will take you to do the job? Most price quotes are based on estimated labor, materials needed and a pro would also need to figure in taxes, licensing, overhead, insurance, etc. plus a little extra to cover anything unseen at the start.

You say you want to help her out and [I assume] would do it for free if not for her insistence. So why not figure on either an hourly wage or a small price to satisfy her and help you out too. Generally a diyer isn't skilled enough or have enough knowledge of painting to command the same price a pro would deserve - no offense intended.

btw - I doubt I'd use any tape on that job I rarely use tape but it does come in handy on occasion. Mostly tape just gives the user a false sense of security.
 
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Old 03-15-10, 07:17 PM
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Thanks for the replys guys. As you indicated marksr I am not a professional painter (no offense was taken)I'm just looking to help someone out. I guess she knows what painting really must cost and that's why she wants to pay me something. You guys are right, there will be furniture to move, blinds to take down, door handles and hinges to take off, plus some light spackling to be done. If I had to guess on how long I would be there I would have to say about three days. Spackle, clean and prime one day, paint the next two days. I am not a fast painter and thats why I'm figuring on three days. The "cutting in" I guess you would call it, is the hardest for me to do. My hand is not to steady when it comes to that or maybe I just do it wrong, in any event it's not easy. I guess I'll go low with a price and if she says that it's too low we'll just find a middle ground. Again, she is a nice lady with a limited income and I'm not trying to line my pockets on her I'm just trying to help someone out. Thanks again guys for the replys.
 
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Old 03-15-10, 07:27 PM
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While skill with a brush takes practice - it starts with a quality brush!! As long as I've been painting, I'd have a difficult time doing a good job with an inferior brush. I'd suggest a 2" purdy sash [angle] brush for most diyers. There are other brands that will also do although purdy is a trusted easy to find brand
 
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Old 03-18-10, 08:08 PM
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painting

Just a suggestion-- don't use spackle, use joint compound. And, it sometimes needs longer than a few hours to dry, so you may need another day in your timing estimate.
 
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Old 03-18-10, 08:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Allison1888 View Post
Just a suggestion-- don't use spackle, use joint compound. And, it sometimes needs longer than a few hours to dry, so you may need another day in your timing estimate.
Suggestion for the suggestion: Use setting joint compound such as 20 minute. You can buy it in a small box and will set in 20 minutes. DO NOT use durabond!

I can't add much with the great reply from Marksr I also agree with the hourly wage idea.
 
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Old 03-19-10, 05:56 AM
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I'm partial to durabond [I've used more of it than any other setting compound ] IMO none of the setting compounds sand easy so it pays to apply it neatly. On large repairs I'll usually switch to regular j/c for the final coat - it sands a lot easier.

I wasn't aware that any of the setting compounds came it a small box - but I've never looked, I always get the durabond [or easysand] in a bag. Since I always have a bucket of j/c handy, I rarely use spackling. Spackling is fine for minor repairs but doesn't work well for bigger repairs and can't be used as a skim coat. Spackling is great for filling nail holes and minor dings.

I probably should add that when using a setting compound you only want to mix up how much you can use in the allotted time [20 min mud will set to hard to use in less than 20min] Any dried setting mud left in the pan is there to stay, unlike regular j/c it isn't water soluble. Clean up should be done immediately.
 
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Old 03-19-10, 11:27 AM
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Based on my experience, a good professional painter will use a rate of about $40 to $50 per hour for labor when doing a quote. You could charge your friend by the hour, but keep in mind that it will probably take you a lot more hours to do the job than it would take a pro.

Comparing your job with jobs I've hired out, a pro would probably charge you $1000 to $1500 for that job. That's total, materials plus labor, and assumes you aren't painting the ceiling or having to do any excessive prep work.

Hope this helps.
 
 

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