Wet paint bubble repair


  #1  
Old 08-21-10, 04:45 PM
L
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Wet paint bubble repair

I was recently painting a room a put a second coat on a day after the first coat. After I was done I noticed a few air bubbles in the still-wet/semi-dry paint. I made a mistake and popped the bubble, which was like a thick skin, and started peeling. It peeled the two new layers clean off and I stopped. The next day, after it dried I sanded, and primed it it, but you can still see the outline of where I peeled it off. It's "thinner' in that area than the rest. Is that because I used a brunch to fix the area and the rest of the wall is rolled? How do I fix this so you can't tell where I peeled that section off without stripping the whole wall? Should I sand again, skim coat, the prime and paint? Roll over it a could of times?

Thanks.
 
  #2  
Old 08-21-10, 08:32 PM
C
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: sw sub chicago
Posts: 1,128
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
put some patching plaster on the spot, let dry well. sand with sand paper on a sanding block. then roll paint. it will be hard to find the spot after this.

been there, done that.
 
  #3  
Old 08-22-10, 04:38 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,076
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
I'm sure he means joint compound and not plaster

It's possible that the affected area might also need a little texture to make it blend with the wall. Hard to say from here if the roller stipple will be enough. The repair will need sanding and primer, you might get away with just 2 coats of finish paint.

The paint bubble was caused by poor adhesion, hopefully whatever contaminant that caused the bubble came off with the paint. It would have been a good idea to sand that area before proceeding further.
 
  #4  
Old 08-22-10, 06:41 AM
C
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: sw sub chicago
Posts: 1,128
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
idk. but it says "DAP patching plaster" (red lid) on the can. am i using the wrong stuff ?
seems to work well enough, but if there is something better.

anyway.
imho. it is near impossible to COMPLETELY blend a repair. but its not hard to have a repair that most people will never see.
 
  #5  
Old 08-22-10, 12:27 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,076
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
Since it's made by DAP, I assume it's a type of spackling - great for minor repairs. I usually use joint compound because I almost always have some Spackling is limitted to minor repairs but j/c can be used for both minor and major repairs, it can also be thinned down to replicate most textures.

Drywall work is like painting, as long as you have the illusion of a perfect/great job - that's what counts! If you try hard enough, with the right light and angle of view you can pick apart any job.
 
  #6  
Old 08-22-10, 10:09 PM
L
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
So I put some joint compound over the paint. I think that was the first mistake. I put it on too thick. That was the second. About three hours later a scrapped it all off. The paint underneath came off as well. It's a mess. So I think my plan is:

1. Sand the whole patch down flat, to smooth the edges and remove whatever is causing the paint not to stick.
2. Apply the joint compound thinly, possible two layers with sanding in between (can I use an orbital sander?) and after.
3. Prime.
4. 2 coats of rolled paint.

Does this make sense?

Thanks,
 
  #7  
Old 08-23-10, 04:15 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,076
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
That should work. An orbital sander should help to get the mess leveled out [latex paint will plug the sandpaper up in short order] After you reapply the j/c, hand sand with either a pole sander or sandpaper held flat with a block of wood. An orbital sander will remove too mcuh j/c and create too much dust
The neater you apply the j/c, the less sanding you will need. I'd rather apply an extra coat of mud than do any extra sanding
 
  #8  
Old 08-23-10, 06:28 AM
C
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: sw sub chicago
Posts: 1,128
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
listen to what Mark said.

also. if you want/need less mess. lay down the "rough in" coats of j/c, sand those with a wet sponge(& bucket of water) = no dust and sands faster. then, when the finish is pretty close, lay down the final (hopefully) top coat of j/c and sand that with sandpaper on a block. and keep an eye on that sandpaper, it can clog up. use a screwdriver to scrape the stuff off.
 
  #9  
Old 08-23-10, 06:55 AM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,630
Received 98 Votes on 86 Posts
I've used patching plaster before and it's not the right product for this job, stick with joint compound
 
  #10  
Old 08-23-10, 01:55 PM
L
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I got some more cracks (still too thick I think) but I sponged them smooth. I'll put another coat on tomorrow. What grit sandpaper should I use?
 
  #11  
Old 08-23-10, 01:59 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,076
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
120 should work well, if you go finer than 150 grit - you'll have to work too hard
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: