Painted trim and it isn't sticking!


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Old 09-07-10, 10:24 AM
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Question Painted trim and it isn't sticking!

This is my first time choosing what I want and doing what I want to a room. It is a two toned room with trim running along the middle of the wall all around and there is trim at the bottom of the wall by the floor. I painted the wall first and let it dry. Then i put my blue painting tape on the concrete so it wouldn't bleed and also on the wall so the white paint for the trim wouldn't bleed onto the wall. A few hours after painting the trim (through out the day i painted 3 coats) i decided to take off the tape to see how it looked. When i started pulling the tape slowly the white paint on the trim started pulling right off with it. Not the entirecoat but just whatever the blue tape was touching. Im so upset because i worked really hard on it. I dont know why it would stick because i used the same brand of paint on the wall and it stuck fine. Is it the trim? The trim had that real wood look to it.

Also I was wondering if there is some sort of clear coat that I can paint over the plum paint that i used on the wall i'm already noticing that after three coats it chips easily. Is there something to put over that wall paint so it won't chip as easily?


Please send any comments or suggestions. I need them very badly!
 
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Old 09-07-10, 02:05 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

Do you know what type of paint was originally on the woodwork?
http://forum.doityourself.com/painti...latex-oil.html

Latex paint takes longer to cure than it does to dry. It can be up to a week or more before the latex paint fully cures. Tape can be problematic, especially when applied over uncured paint. Also the paint on the wall/wood that is also on the tape forms a bond. Unless this bond is cut, there is a likelihood that the paint on the substrate will pull off along with the tape

At this time your best bet is to sand down the peeled areas so you can redo them. If you must use tape, either remove the tape while the paint is still a little wet or take a utility knife or razor blade to cut the paint bond between the substrate and the tape.
 
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Old 09-09-10, 07:25 PM
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Unhappy

Thank you for the reply. I tried to use sand paper to thin the edges around the spots that caught on the tape. Now the entire layer of paint will come off when i barely touch it. I'm using Latex Valspar paint. I'm curious to know if the trim has some type of finish on it, and maybe that is why the paint won't stick. The same paint is sticking perfect on the drywall. Do you think I need to redo the trim around the room? We have a stained concrete floor in the room that I am painting in. I am not sure how expensive and difficult it would be to purchase a new trim for the walls. Or if I could just take all the trim off and paint where the trim is. This is very frustrating! Thanks for your help, any more suggestions now that the sandpaper trick isn't working?
 

Last edited by marksr; 09-10-10 at 05:03 AM. Reason: removed unneeded quote
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Old 09-10-10, 05:09 AM
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Your woodwork sounds like it had an oil base enamel on it [or varnish/poly] Unfortunately latex paint doesn't bond well to the harder/slicker finish of oil. The correct method would have been either to stick with oil or switch to latex by 1st using a solvent based primer.

Ideally all the latex would be removed and then the woodwork redone correctly...... but all is not lost, latex paints will develop a stronger bond given a week or 2 to cure. It won't be perfect and it will chip on occasion but it should do better than it is right now.

Your paint has adhered well to the drywall because it has always been painted with latex paint.
 
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Old 09-10-10, 05:39 AM
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Well I started to look at the trim that I haven't painted yet and I dont even think it is real wood, it felt like it would weigh nothing. and it was very soft. Im gonna price NEW trim to see how much that could be
 
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Old 09-10-10, 10:19 AM
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I talked to my dad about over the phone and he said I could either use sand paper or some type of pad like an SOS pad and sand the trim a little so it has a rough edge and then put primer before the paint. Do you think this would be a good idea?
 
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Old 09-10-10, 01:42 PM
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You can use either sandpaper or steel wool. You wouldn't want to use a brillo or SOS pad because of the soap residue. While steel wool would be ok for readying the wood for an oil primer, you want to stay away from steel wool when using latex paint. Any leftover steel fibers that get painted over will rust, discoloring your paint.
 
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Old 09-11-10, 06:48 AM
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Last night I tried to sand the trim to see if I could get a rough edge. It didn't leave a rough edge, it just faded the fake wood look. I painted a small area after I sanded it with primer and let it dry over night. This morning I used the latex paint over the primer. It doesn't seem like it is going to work out because I could even peel off the primer just like the paint did before. Any more suggestions? This is giving me a headache!
 
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Old 09-11-10, 02:27 PM
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What kind of primer are you using?
 
 

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