PAINTING


  #1  
Old 12-10-00, 03:44 PM
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THANKS FOR YOUR REPLY. I AM HELPING MY BOYFRIEND PAINT HIS NEW PLACE. WE WERE TOLD THAT YOU ARE NOT SUPPOSED TO PAINT SEMIGLOSS OVER SEMIGLOSS BECAUSE IT WILL PEEL. WE KNOW TO HAVE THE AREA CLEAN AND DRY, WE DIDN'T WANT TO HAVE TO SAND WHAT IS ALREADY A SMOOTH SURFACE. WE WANT AS LITTLE WORK AS POSSIBLE. BUT WE DON'T WANT TO HAVE TO START OVER BECAUSE WE DIDN'T DO IT RIGHT THE FIRST TIME. I AM STILL NOT CLEAR IF WE CAN PAINT THE WALLS AS THEY ARE NOW OR NOT.
 
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Old 12-10-00, 05:18 PM
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semi-gloss over semi-gloss

I hear you about not wanting to do more work than necessary. HOWEVER - if you don't prep it right you will be very sorry. The thing about sanding before painting is that over semi-gloss, you're not trying to get it smooth when you sand, you're trying to rough it up. A new coating won't adhere to a surface that's too smooth. You have to create what's called a "tooth" - something to stick to. You can do it by sanding. I prefer to get sanding pads. They're made by 3M and look like 1" thick sponges. They make the work go very fast and don't tear like paper does. If you use that, get a medium/coarse (each side has a different grit). Then just go lightly over the whole thing and wipe the dust off. There shouldn't be much dust. You can't go real hard on it - if it's latex enamel and you sand too hard it will start to roll up on you and that's not good. It will show after the final coat. Another way to dull the surface and create a tooth is to use TSP. Just make a mild solution and wipe it over the walls and rinse it off with water. One caution on this - if the existing paint has been there awhile it may be dirty even if it doesn't look like it. Always wash from the BOTTOM UP, because if you don't the drips will leave streaks below, and will show through the finish coat. I learned this the hard way! Good luck!
 
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Old 12-11-00, 12:30 AM
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BATSON,

Allow me to be more specific reguarding my reply, provided they are thoroughly cleaned and you use a quality paint, you can paint latex on latex, you can paint oil based on latex, you can paint oil on oil, the no-no is painting latex directly on oil based. If it is oil based and you are wanting to go with a latex the walls must be sanded lighlty (220 grit) then primed with an oil based primer (like kilz) Allowed to thoroughly dry then coated with latex.
If you are not sure what the existing paint is, then you can do a simple test. Wipe the wall with a wet rag, if it changes color temporarily then it is latex, if it does not(some latex semi-gloss won't) then go to your local pro paint store and purchase a small container of Goof-Off, use a rag on a hidden spot on the wall, scrub with the Goof-Off, if it starts to remove the paint then it is latex, if it does not then it is oil based.

Good luck!

 
 

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