Color changing ceiling paint

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Old 10-25-10, 11:48 AM
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Color changing ceiling paint

I am gonna be painting the ceiling in every room in my house to freshen up things. Looking to get opinions on the best color changing paint out there to use. I have found reviews on some out there such as the valspar that turns purple to white but it has really crappy reviews. Any help on this topic would be great. Thanks in advance
 
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Old 10-25-10, 12:23 PM
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Welcome to the forums

Why do you need a color changing paint?

I've never had a problem telling where I'd been even when touching up the same color

I'd go to a paint store (not a paint department in a larger store) and see what they have to say
 
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Old 10-25-10, 12:55 PM
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i was thinking a color changing paint because the house we bought has a shen on the ceiling so was thinking it would be easier to see where i have been. painting really isnt my favorite thing to do so i wanna make it as easy as possible
 
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Old 10-25-10, 01:13 PM
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Easy painting is when you hire somone else to do it

Next best thing is quality paints and brushes and rollers
 
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Old 10-25-10, 02:10 PM
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I don't think I've ever used any of the color changing ceiling paint but I've never had any problem with applying paint on the ceiling. The main thing is to use plenty of paint. I like to load the paint on the roller, smear it over a section of ceiling and then lay it off with the now drier roller. Generally you are better off with a little longer nap roller cover than a shorter nap when painting ceilings.

Keeping the roller well lubricated with paint makes rolling a lot easier. If you apply a heavy enough coat of paint, you'll get better coverage and normally touch up will work better. If you ceilings have popcorn texture it's best to coat them with an oil primer first. That will prevent the moisture in the latex paint from softening up the texture causing it to lift from the drywall.
 
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Old 10-25-10, 09:00 PM
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Stryker6040:

I think the real question shouldn't be: "Why use a colour changing ceiling paint?" but rather, "Why use a ceiling paint?"

You should be aware that ceiling paints are really just low quality wall paints with lots of anti-spatter additive in them. The thinking of the paint company is: You don't need as good a paint on the ceiling as you do on the walls. That's cuz ceilings don't get dirty so you don't need to clean them, and so you don't need a paint that uses a more expensive better quality plastic binder that dries to a HARD film that will stand up well to scrubbing to remove stubborn marks; you can get by with a lesser quality binder that forms a softer film. So, you get a paint that dries to a softer film that's more likely to losing all it's gloss when you scrub it to clean a mark off the ceiling. The paint company is right that ceilings don't need much cleaning. On the other hand, from a practical standpoint, you want the hardest latex film you can get so that you don't dull the gloss of the paint by scrubbing it to clean a stubborn mark off. That's because with ceiling mounted light fixtures and windows that come within a few inches of the ceiling, light reflecting off the ceiling's surface is going to make that dulled spot stand out like a sore thumb and look worse than the original mark did.

Also, ceiling paints will invariably be dead flat. It's true that flat paints scatter light in all directions providing more even lighting throughout the room. And, it's also true that you won't notice a dull spot where you scrubbed off a stubborn mark on flat paint that's dull everywhere anyhow. On the other hand, rough surfaces are much harder to clean. Soot from burning candles or nicotine staining from smoking cigarettes is harder to clean off flat paint than a smoother paint like a satin or velvet. The real reason for ceiling paints all being dead flat is because the most expensive component in a can of latex paint is the plastic binder resins. The lower the quality of the plastic binder and/or the less of it in the can, the lower the price of the paint. And, the mind set when making a ceiling paint is that you can save the customer some money by making a lesser quality paint for the ceilings because ceilings don't need high quality paint cuz they don't get much wear and tear.

If it were my house, I'd use the same quality paint on my ceilings as I would on my walls. I just wouldn't repaint the ceilings as often as I repaint the walls. That way, I have the same durability of paint on my ceilings, but I don't paint them as often because the paint up there doesn't get as much wear and tear as the walls do. And, if you use a top quality wall paint, you won't have any spatter to speak of from that paint either.

So, if it were me, I'd use a top quality velvet or even satin wall paint on your ceilings. If you want to save money, wait for a paint sale. They happen all the time.

You don't need to read the rest of this post, but if you want to make the painting process go faster and easier, consider these tips:

If you're planning on having white or off-white walls and ceilings, use a piece of sheet metal to "cut in". Just apply some 2 inch wide masking tape to the edge of a 12" by 24" or so piece of sheet metal to prevent it from marking the walls, and bend the taped edge of the sheet metal into the wall/ceiling corner as you spread the paint up to the sheet metal with a 3 inch wide roller. DON'T start right at the corner with a fully loaded roller or you'll squeeze liquid paint under the sheet metal and onto the neighboring wall. You want to start a foot or so away from the wall and spread the paint toward the corner so that the roller is wet with, but not loaded with, paint when you get to the sheet metal. The sheet metal will allow you to spread the paint right into the corner without having to use the same care you would by cutting in with a brush. It's true that the line in that corner won't be sharp and crisp as it would if done with a brush, but if you're painting your ceiling white and your walls off-white, even an eagle wouldn't see any difference.

Go around the perimeter of the ceiling, and around the bases of any ceiling mounted light fixtures, and then fill in the rest with a 10 inch roller the following day to make short work of it. When I do this work, I use three chairs and have a helper moving the chairs for me and moving a Black and Decker Workmate that the paint tray is on. That doubles the speed of the work because you don't have to continually be stepping up onto and off of the chairs; you just step from chair to chair.

If, after painting with the 10 inch roller and allowing a full day for that paint to dry, you see any "picture framing" effect where the colour intensity is strongest around the perimeter of the ceiling, that means you're not getting complete hide with one coat. If you were, you wouldn't be able to see any difference between one coat and two. The fact that the colour is more intense around the perimeter of the ceiling (where the 10 inch roller overlapped the area previously painted with the 3 inch roller) means that 2 coats hides better than one coat, and so you're not getting complete hide with only one coat. That means you need to buy a better quality paint, which will probably have more of the high hiding white pigment titanium dioxide, TiO2, in it. In my view, it makes more sense to pay more for better paint and get complete hide in one coat than it does to pay half as much per gallon for cheaper paint, but then have to put two coats on.

And, since you will need to use a brush (at least on the corners of the ceiling where two walls meet) you should be aware that it's good practice to wet your brush with water (if using latex paint) or mineral spirits (if using oil based paint) before painting with it. That's because capillary pressure will draw those solvents high up into brush and keep them there. That way, any paint that gets up into the tight bristles near the ferrule won't dry there while you're using the brush. The moisture previously drawn up into that area by capillary pressure will thin the paint that gets up there and prevent it from drying out. So, then when you go to wash your brush out with water or paint thinner, the brush washes out not only much faster, but completely. That keeps your brushes in good shape. Nothing is worse than trying to paint with a hard and shaggy brush, and that's caused by paint getting high up in the bristles and drying there so that it's not removed when the brush is cleaned. Obviously, even the water or mineral spirits wicked high up into the brush will eventually evaporate, so it's a good idea to use an eye dropper to add water or mineral spirits to your brush periodically.

Hope this helps.
 

Last edited by Nestor; 10-25-10 at 09:45 PM.
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