Painting Solid Core 6-Panel Doors


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Old 10-29-10, 03:24 PM
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Painting Solid Core 6-Panel Doors

Need some advice on how to best paint unprimed 6-panel doors. I've painted primed 6-panel doors in the past, but have always had to apply two coats, which is very frustrating/time consuming. I'm assuming I'll have to first apply a high quality primer, then a coat of paint, but was wondering if there are any tricks or techniques to speed up the process (e.g., use a brush and a roller, etc.). Doors are natural wood color and will be painted white.
 
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Old 10-29-10, 03:40 PM
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Wondering....are these solid wood..or a prefinished masonite type? They made those ...and may still.

Reason why I wonder is...solid wood doors are normally much more expensive than the masonite skinned type...and not as stable when exposed to temp and humidity changes.
 
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Old 10-29-10, 04:31 PM
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Solid wood I believe. About $150 for a 30" door. They can be stained or painted. Trying to cut down on sound transmission as much as possible because we have vaulted ceilings. Not sure how much the door is going to help, but it should make some difference (shouldn't it). Or am I wasting my money?
 
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Old 10-29-10, 04:52 PM
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If you haven't purchased them yet...check on your suppliers "Safe and Sound" type doors. That's what Masonite used to call theirs, might have changed. Prob cheaper and more stable than solid wood.
 
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Old 10-29-10, 05:31 PM
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What do you mean by more "stable"? Are masonite doors more expensive though? Do you know if they have a higher STC than solid core wooden doors?
 
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Old 10-29-10, 05:36 PM
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Not normally more expensive..no. Depends on whether you are going off the shelf or ordering. Are you just replacing the doors or frame and all?

Wood "breathes"...the rails and stiles expand and contract. When staining you would normally use wood...when painting you would normally go composite (masonite)

Gotta go do dinner..others will be around.
 
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Old 10-29-10, 06:19 PM
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Installing a couple new and replacing a couple, but in each case, I will be installing the entire door (incl. frame). My main reason for going with solid doors is to cut down on sound transmission. Just not sure if its worth the extra cost. If not, I may just go with the hollow core prehung 6-panel doors.
 
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Old 10-30-10, 04:58 AM
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If you are going to paint the doors - use the masonite. They paint better than a wooden panel door. Masonite is 1 solid sheet on each side and paint nice. A wooden door has multiple pieces and the panels 'float' because of this they move around with temp and humidity changes. The result is a unsightly crack where the panel meets the door's frame.

I don't know for sure but would think a masonite door would transmit less sound since it has hollow spaces inside. A masonite door should be considerably cheaper than it's wood counterpart.

To paint a wood door you need to first apply a primer [preferably an enamel undercoater], sand when dry and apply 1-2 coats of enamel. A masonite door is best painted by applying a primer, sanding and 1 coat of enamel but you can get a decent job by sanding the stiles and then applying 1 coat of enamel.
 
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Old 10-30-10, 05:27 AM
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I can't remember ever disagreeing with marksr before but here goes. I have 3 wood six panel doors in my off my kitchen hallway. They were purchased unpainted and unprimed. I have painted them twice in 20+ years. I used a latex primer and a latex top coat. I painted the tapered parts of the panels with a brush and used a 4" roller for the rest of the door.

Currently, they are painted two tone with the panels painted a slightly contrasting color to the off white frame. Only one of the three doors (bathroom) has ever exhibited any noticeable movement. A couple of the panels shrunk and I simply painted the small area
(< 1/8") of exposed bare wood. I only had to do that once.
 
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Old 10-30-10, 07:12 AM
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One clarification....
Remember...I said check on the "Safe and Sound" type semi-solid core doors. They are basically filled with a type of semi-compressed masonite. The really cut down sound (more than wood) and almost (but not quite) have a 20 min fire rating.

They will have to be ordered...but they should be on par or less than solid wood doors...even with the ordering. You will also be able to choose whatever panel style you like.

btw...from the testing I have seen...the sound transmission attenuation is (worst to best) hollow core wood, hollow core Masonite, solid wood paneled, solid core (MDF) wood, Safe and Sound solid core. It has something to do with the different densities of material in the S and S doors. And that was for common household noises..TV, kids, PC's. Big thumping bass will get through anything...lol
 
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Old 10-30-10, 02:07 PM
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Thanks gunguy, that's the type of response I was looking for.
 
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Old 10-31-10, 10:25 AM
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Mossman:

As long as you do everything feasible to eliminate "flanking paths" around the door, such as minimize the air gap under the door, then the most sound proof door you can buy will be the heaviest one. And, that's because sound, like every other wave, obeys the laws of physics.

When a sound wave hits a wall, the wall moves slightly in response and recreates a sound wave on the opposite side of that wall. It's that reproduced wave you hear, not the original.

And it's this basic principle that gives rise to something called the "Mass Law" of acoustics. The Mass Law says that for every doubling of either the mass of the wall per unit area or the frequency of the noise, the amplitude of the reproduced wave is reduced by 6 decibels, or 1/4 of it's previous amplitude. But, because our hearing isn't linear (we hear quite sounds better and loud sounds worse) the amount of noise attenuation doesn't seem to our ears like it's reduced by 75%.

But the Mass Law makes complete sense from a Newtonian Physics point of view. The more massive a wall (or door) the greater it's weight per square foot, and the less it moves in response to the sound wave. The less it moves, the lower the amplitude of the reproduced wave, and hence the noise we hear on the opposide side of the wall is quieter.

Also, the more massive a wall (or door) the greater it's inertia, and the less able it is to change it's direction of motion quickly enough to respond to the sound wave. Consequently, as the frequency goes up, you get to the point that the wall, door or ceiling simply can't respond to the sound wave because of it's inertia, and the wall, door or ceiling (or floor) simply remains stationary regardless of how loud the high frequency sound. The result is no noise on the other side of the wall because the wall doesn't move in response to the noise, and therefore no reproduced sound wave is created.

And, it's for this reason that when some monkey in your apartment block is having a party and you're trying to sleep, you can't hear the music that's being played, you can only hear BOOM-BOOM-BOOM. What's happening is that the inertia of the walls, floors and ceilings in the building are filtering out the high frequency sounds, but responding to the low frequency sound only. So, all you hear are the bass notes, and there isn't enough information there to identify the song that's being played.

You can learn a lot about accoustics in buildings at the National Research Council of Canada's web site. National Research Council Canada: Home

Read this one for a good basic understanding of accoustics:
Sound Transmission Through Building Components - IRC - NRC-CNRC

So, as a first start, if you really want sound proof doors, you should be talking to someone in NORAD about who built those 40 ton solid steel blast doors inside Cheyenne Mountain in Colorado. Those would do.

But, just keep the principle of mass in mind whenever it comes to soundproofing. Plaster walls are heavier than drywall, so old houses are quieter than new ones. To, keep sound from coming through windows, a pair of heavy solid wood shutters on he outside and heavy fabric drapes on the inside will do much more than adding another pane of glass... etc.
 
 

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