Pewter gray is too blue....

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Old 11-05-10, 08:00 PM
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Pewter gray is too blue....

Hi. On a whim yesterday, I decided I wanted to paint my bedroom walls gray to go with a great comforter set I ordered. When I went to get the paint, I looked over all my options and decided on pewter gray, simply because the shade was not too dark, but not too light. However, I kept questioning if I was seeing a hint of blue, and decided I wasn't.

Today, we painted the bedroom and I kept seeing the hint of blue again, so I searched online only to find that pewter gray is supposed to have a hint of blue. Maybe should have done the search first, huh? lol

Now I'm really worried that the room is not going to look the way it did in my head when I had this idea when it's finished, and I think I might hate it.

Is there anything that I can possibly spray over the walls, or something simple like that, rather than to repaint the entire room that will give it more of a gray look? Or, are there any suggestions that anyone has that might make the blue tint less noticeable? Design suggestions....whatever. Anything would be helpful.

Also, got flat paint (red) for the trim, because it was less expensive, and now I'm hating it. The trim is a rough wood and it looks awful. Looks like I used a magic marker or something? Anyway I can spice this up or make it look more shiny or something? Thanks for any suggestions anyone might have!!
 
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Old 11-05-10, 09:10 PM
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Paint over the pewter with a neutral gray paint.

Gray hides well if you get a good quality paint. It should only take one coat.
 
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Old 11-05-10, 09:24 PM
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I appreciate your suggestion, but we were really trying to find a way to do it without having to completely repaint the room. We are VERY, VERY far from professionals, so that's a lot of work for us. haha
But.... we may have to go that route. Unfortunately, there is not a single paint chip in the store that says plain old gray.... nor is there one that says red. So.... you kind of have to guess what will look best, and guess what color it will actually turn once you put it on the wall it seems. I love to paint! Just never turns out well for me it seems. Oh well.... still fun. Thanks again!
 
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Old 11-06-10, 03:36 AM
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While the actual color won't change, the other colors in the room can change how a particular color appears. Years ago I painted my parents living rm and dining rm. Depending on the lighting the walls appeared to have a yellow, gold or green cast to them.

I'm not sue I understand about the rough trim wood but interior woodwork should never be painted with a flat paint. Enamel usually looks better and is less likely to get dirty.
 
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Old 11-06-10, 07:54 AM
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when i moved in here, i painted grey. with grey carpet. the rooms actually looked light blue. i painted the kitchen beige, it ended up having a peach tint to it. i painted the bedrooms a light beige, they actually look light grey.
 
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Old 11-06-10, 12:40 PM
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I agree that Marksr's idea of changing the lighting in the room holds the most promise for good results without actually repainting the wall.

You see, blue pigments reflect blue light. (More correctly, blue pigments absorb all the frequencies of light EXCEPT blue.)

So, if you change your light bulbs to ones that contain less blue (called "lower temperature bulbs), there will be less blue light in the spectrum of light hitting the walls, and hence, less blue light in the spectrum of light reflected off the walls.

If you have CF bulbs for lighting, you should be aware that CF bulbs come in about 4 standard colours; Soft White, Bright White, Cool White and Daylight. Soft White resembles the colour of incandescent bulbs and has the least blue light in it's spectrum. Daylight is at the other end of the scale with the most blue light.

But, if that doesn't work, then the only way to change the colour of the light reflected off the wall is by repainting the wall.
 
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Old 11-08-10, 05:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Nestor View Post
I agree that Marksr's idea of changing the lighting in the room holds the most promise for good results without actually repainting the wall.

You see, blue pigments reflect blue light. (More correctly, blue pigments absorb all the frequencies of light EXCEPT blue.)

So, if you change your light bulbs to ones that contain less blue (called "lower temperature bulbs), there will be less blue light in the spectrum of light hitting the walls, and hence, less blue light in the spectrum of light reflected off the walls.

If you have CF bulbs for lighting, you should be aware that CF bulbs come in about 4 standard colours; Soft White, Bright White, Cool White and Daylight. Soft White resembles the colour of incandescent bulbs and has the least blue light in it's spectrum. Daylight is at the other end of the scale with the most blue light.

But, if that doesn't work, then the only way to change the colour of the light reflected off the wall is by repainting the wall.
Wow.... that's some great information. Very interesting! I had no idea. I will have to look at my bulbs and see what they are. It seems like I usually buy the soft white.... but, I better check. Sounds much easier than repainting for sure.

However.... I was wondering if something like this might work, or if it sounds stupid. You know they make that metallic silver spray paint, right? What if I were to get a couple of cans of that and just spray a very light mist over the paint? Just enough to give it a shine? I wonder if that might give it more of a gray look. With my luck.... it probably make the blue stand out more. But.... I've been running different ideas through my mind the last couple of days, and that seemed somewhat plausible. Either that, or maybe a gray primer of some sort? I don't know.... I just really hope to not have to repaint. What a major pain!

As far as the trim goes.... can't I get a clear glossy spray paint to spray over that to give it more of a shine, or will that work for this situation?

Thanks so much for everyone's thoughts on this! This is a pretty handy little site here. I have used something similar for my cell phone, but never before for my little "decorating" adventures. I decide to do one of these every so often. Last time the crisis was that I got some free paint from a friend and used it for the trim in the kitchen and then tried to use it to paint my cabinets and it wouldn't stay on for anything. Finally found later that it was exterior latex paint and wasn't made for what I was trying to paint at all. So.... I'm actually pretty used to something going wrong. I'm sure I'll come up with something. But, will definitely be checking the bulbs right away. Thank you so much!
 
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Old 11-08-10, 07:49 AM
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Typically it won't say on the bulb what colour it is, only on the box or carded pack the bulbs came in.

Spray paint can be hard to get good results with for the inexperienced. I'd be concerned that you wouldn't end up with a uniformly thick coat of paint, and that'll make the wall look "blotchy" and you'll end up painting over the spray paint anyhow.

Also, the trouble with spray paint is that you have to mask everything off that you don't want to paint, and that take as much time and painting longhand.

One of the problems with most paint companies is that the colour samples they provide aren't much bigger than a postage stamp. There is a paint company called "C2 Paints" that have 8 1/2 inch by 11 inch colour samples so that you get a much better idea of the colour of the paint. C2 makes truly excellent paints, but they are expensive. They do, however, greatly reduce the liklihood of not liking the colour of the paint you choose because of their very large swatch sizes.
 
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