Looking for oil-based primer and textured paint with no VOC

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  #1  
Old 11-07-10, 06:48 PM
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Looking for oil-based primer and textured paint with no VOC

I need to paint over some wallpaper, and I've heard it's best to use oil-based primer. I also need a textured paint because the walls are textured. Does anyone know where I can get these things with no or very low VOC's?

Thanks!
 
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Old 11-07-10, 07:30 PM
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You simply cannot get a low or zero VOC oil based primer. It's true that oil based primers tend to stick to smooth surfaces like vinyl coated wallpaper better than latex primers. But, you can't get true linseed oil based primers any more, the best you can do is an alkyd primer, and all of those, whether interior or exterior will use mineral spirits as the thinner. The old linseed oil based primers used turpentine as the thinner, and I expect turpentine is mostly VOC's as well.

I like to think I know a thing or two about paint. If I wanted to paint over wallpaper, I'd use either an interior oil based primer (linseed oil if I could get it) OR a super sticky primer like either Zinsser's Bullseye 123 latex primer or Zinsser's BIN shellac based primer. Zinsser boasts that their BIN primer will stick to smooth surfaces such as glazed ceramic wall tiles, high gloss polyurethane, sheet metal and smooth plastics. I've never used BIN, but I use Bullseye 123 regularily and in my humble opinion, it'll stick to anything like chewing gum to the underside of a church pew. So, with all due respect to the advice you've already received, you'd do as well with either Bullseye 123 or BIN as you would with an oil based primer. BIN is a shellac based primer, which means the thinner in it is alcohol (probably denatured ethyl alcohol, or isopropyl alcohol. Bullseye 123 is a latex primer that uses a PVA binder. PVA, or polyvinyl acetate is the same plastic used in white wood glues. So, Bullseye 123 is a latex primer that uses the same plastic as white wood glues as it's binder, and I'm sure the binder resin used was chosen because of it's adhesive qualities alone.

You can get low and zero VOC product in latex wall paints. I was given a gallon sample of zero VOC latex paint to try, and I found that it worked well. But VOC's from latex paint don't bother me, and I even like that "newly painted" smell, so I never bought any of the stuff. It was an ICI product if I recall. Glidden 2000 I think it was called. Don't know if they still make the stuff, but you shouldn't have a problem finding a low or zero VOC interior latex paint that will simply cover the existing wallpaper.

I think Home Depot sells a "textured" wall paint that has some sort of texture to it when applied with a roller. I've never used the stuff so I can't say more than that about it.

And, truth be told, it's really better to remove wallpaper than paint over it. Painting over it will simply protect the glue holding it on, thereby making it more difficult to remove in future.
 

Last edited by Nestor; 11-07-10 at 07:48 PM.
  #3  
Old 11-08-10, 04:11 AM
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Is there any reason you can't remove the wallpaper? It's hardly ever a good idea to paint over wallpaper. If the wallpaper ever looses it's adhesion, it will take the paint/texture applied over it with it As noted above, any coating over the wallpaper will complicate removal later.
 
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Old 11-08-10, 04:14 AM
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Thanks

Thank you so much for your advice. Are the other primers you mentioned VOC-free? I can't use paint that has chemicals in it.

FYI, the reason I was told to use oil-based primer is not as much for stickiness, but because any other paint will soak through the wallpaper and make it peel.

I wish I could just remove it, but I've been removing wallpaper from other areas of the house for three weeks, and I'm simply out of time.

Thanks again!
 
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Old 11-08-10, 04:23 AM
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I don't think it's possible to get a zero VOC solvent based primer/paint although some might have less VOCs than others.

Would wearing a respirator be an option? Fresh air ventilation will help cleanse the air in the room..... just make sure the room stays warm enough for the primer to dry properly.
 
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Old 11-08-10, 05:35 AM
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Just a thought, but Zinsser does make a 'no odour' oil based primer that works incredibly well. I've used it a number of times and literally when I went to clean my brushes at the end of the day I couldn't tell which one I'd used for the oil primer and which one I'd used for white ceiling paint! Eventually I just gambled and won.

Not saying it has no VOC, but as Marksr says a little ventilation goes a long way.
 
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Old 11-08-10, 06:09 AM
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I can't use a paint with VOC's, even with a respirator and ventilation.
 
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Old 11-08-10, 08:53 AM
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'Oil based' and 'no VOC' are contradictory terms

Looks like you may need to allow more time to remove the wall paper
 
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