Cutting-in/Edging Questions

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Old 11-10-10, 06:59 AM
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Cutting-in/Edging Questions

Hi:
I recently painted two bedrooms, and I noticed that I had to cut-in the edges twice or three times in order to get full coverage. The rolling covered the wall much better and required touch-up work. I have good-quality brushes, so I'm wondering if I have bad technique.

Any suggestions?

Thanks.
 
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Old 11-10-10, 07:33 AM
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Hard to tell exactly from your question but I wonder if you were trying to get too much paint out of your brush and roller before applying more paint to them
 
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Old 11-10-10, 09:00 AM
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MChrist:

It's very possible that you're using your sash brush wrong. Most newbies will look at a sash brush like this:



and noting that the bristles are longer on one side than the other, deduce that the brush is meant to be used like this:



which is incorrect.

The bristles are shorter on one side than the other so that when you use the brush correctly (as show below), all of the bristles flare out the same amount, so that you get a much more defined edge to your cut in paint line.



This is a very common mistake people make.
 
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Old 11-10-10, 10:41 AM
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Nestor:
Thanks for the advice! You are correct and your pictures are accurate for my technique. I will try the alternate technique described.
 
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Old 11-10-10, 12:12 PM
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Yeah, I attended a special seminar on proper sash brush usage.
 
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Old 11-10-10, 05:03 PM
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one other thing I find is that when dipping the brush for edging, you often get paint only on the oustide bristles and then when you scrape the brush, you take most of this off. I like to jab the end of brush lightly after dipping to force some paint onto the inside bristles, then scrape the excess back into the container. This works some paint into the centre bristles so that the brush holds more and I find it also holds the bristles together better as edge, resulting in a cleaner edge.
 
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Old 11-10-10, 11:04 PM
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Another thing people do is start using a dry brush when they start painting. Bad move. It's always a good idea to wash out your brush with whatever thinner you'll be using to clean the paint out of the brush BEFORE you start painting.

That way, capillary pressure draws that thinner (water or mineral spirits) high up into the bristles of the brush. So, any paint that gets up there stays liquid while you paint rather than drying out. So, when it comes time to clean out your brush, not only will the paint wash out faster, it'll wash out completely.

Obviously, the paint in your brush will be drying while you use it, so it's a good idea to use an eye dropper to add either water or mineral spirits to the bristles of your brush near the metal ferrule to keep that area saturated with thinner. That will prevent any paint from drying out inside your brush while you're using it, and that helps prevent "shaggy" brushes, where the dried paint inside the brush causes the bristles of the brush to flare out all over the place, and the brush bristles to become stiff because they're held together by dried up paint.

A few drops of thinner applied to the brush bristles near the ferrule every half hour or so will keep your brushes in "new" condition very much longer.
 

Last edited by Nestor; 11-10-10 at 11:57 PM.
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Old 11-11-10, 06:19 AM
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I don't care much for using a brush that still has some of the paint's reducer in it. Starting out with a dry brush helps to prevent paint from getting on the ferrule, handle and eventually my hand.

When you dip a brush into the paint you don't need to rake the excess off - that's starts you out without enough paint. Instead take the brush full of paint and 'slap' it against the sides of the work pot. This will remove the excess paint that might drip off of the brush. The more paint your brush has when it hits the wall, the better it will cover and the more paint you can apply.

The only times I've ever had an issue with paint drying in the stock is on very hot days. Depending on what I'm painting, I'll either deal with it or set that brush in thinner/water and pick up a clean brush to finish the day with.
 
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