painted ceiling has "flashiing" problem


  #1  
Old 12-22-10, 10:14 AM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 1,199
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
painted ceiling has "flashiing" problem

I think that is correct term. I painted ceiling of addition. used behr new drywall primer then behr ceiling paint (flat-white, using 9in roller with 3/8" nap). looked pretty good after a coat, but several areas I didn't think were acceptable. I tried to touch up area, but then could see it so I decided to put on second coat. came to look at it next day and it looked awful. you can see what looks like differences in sheen I guess. some areas reflect light differently than others. talking with friend and we thought maybe I didn't overlap enough? is that the likely cause and if not, then what is?

also, I painted a wall with eggshell finish. found area that had lump in it and picked out lump and went over it feathering it out a good bit. but after dry, I can see very slight difference in sheen. I also found some areas that have minor brush marks where the white primer can be seen. it is subtle and wife probably wouldn't even notice-but I know it is there! can these areas be touched up or would I have to put whole second coat on to avoid the "flashing" problem. oh, and should I be using thicker nap? for some reason I use 3/8"-think I read that back when I was painting nursery for my 7 year old and that was first time I ever painted.
 
  #2  
Old 12-22-10, 01:58 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,090
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
Is this new drywall? or a repaint? What type of texture [if any] is on the ceiling?

The roller nap size is one of the problems. I'd use 1/2" on a slick ceiling, possibly a heavier nap if there is texture.

I've not used enough of Behr's coatings to know how they apply but generally a cheaper coating doesn't cover as well and often won't roll/brush as well either I don't know how well their coatings touch up.

More than likely your issues are caused by not enough paint being applied. Another coat of the same paint, applied more liberally may fix it - I know another coat of decent quality paint applied correctly will fix it.
 
  #3  
Old 12-22-10, 05:03 PM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 1,199
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
yes, this is new drywall and I primed it with Behr new drywall primer. There is no texture on the ceiling. So I should use 1/2" nap on the ceiling? and the walls as well?

I have had people tell me they have no problems with Behr premium plus (from home depot) I don't know prices elsewhere for different paints, but it is about $25/gallon, $105/5gallon, which does't seem cheap to me but maybe it is comparitively?

I also thought that maybe I wasn't putting enough on the roller and moving too slowly and therefore letting it dry too much before I get to the next row. I was cutting in as I was rolling (cut in about 2' wide area, paint a row, then cut in next section and paint) should I cut in whole room first and then just roll? this would really quicken up time till I get to next row and help to maintain a wet edge. with this in mind, I thought I moved much more quickly when putting on second coat on ceiling (since didn't redo cut ins) and was trying to put on thicker coat-yet it turned out poorly? really disappointing.

I have read that touching up gloss, semi-gloss and eggshell is difficult and often have to paint from break to break-is that true?

oh, the roller covers are SHUR-LINE and say for semi-smooth surfaces. they have dupont teflon on them.
 
  #4  
Old 12-22-10, 10:18 PM
N
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Canada
Posts: 448
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Hammerash:

The most probable cause I can see is that the second coat of paint didn't dry properly because of the high humidity caused by the first coat of paint. Bathrooms are small, and you'd be pretty close to 100% humidity after the first coat of paint. Was there anything done to ventilate that humid air before applying the second coat of paint?

I do a fair bit of painting, and I typically use 3/8 inch nap Nour rollers over both bare drywall/plaster and over flat painted surfaces. When I paint, I do all the cutting in one day, and all the filling in the next. So, none of those things would seem to be a problem in my view. And, I've used Behr paint in the past, and it's short comings are that it spatters more and doesn't hide as well (depending on colour and gloss level), but it's not such a lousy paint that it won't even dry to a uniform gloss.

You have the terminology correct. "Flashing" is the non-uniform gloss in the dry paint film caused by the paint not forming a film properly. This kind of problem only occurs in latex paints because oil based paints have a much more robust film formation process. And, flashing is always caused by something interfering with the film formation process in latex paints, or mixing two incompatable latex paints and applying that mixed paint. In this case, I suspect that the humidity from the first coat of paint prevented the second coat of paint from drying properly.

After you painted the first time, how long did you wait before you applied the second coat, and was there any ventilation in the bathroom during this time to help that second coat dry?

But, you'd still do well to repaint that bathroom a third time even if you were pleased as punch with the paint job you have. That's because to get good performance from a latex paint under humid conditions like a bathroom, you need to use a paint specifically made for bathrooms like Zinsser's PermaWhite Bathroom paint or Sherwin Williams Bath Paint.

Your Behr paint should look fine (if it weren't for the humidity from the first coat of paint interfering with the proper drying of the second coat), but it won't STAY looking good for long. Regular latex paints will stand up well on a bedroom or living room wall or ceiling, but under conditions of high humidity, regular latex paints will soften and lose their adhesion, and this typically results in such paints cracking and peeling in bathrooms, especially high up on the walls or on the ceilings directly over the shower area (where moisture and humidity are highest).

By painting over what you have now with a paint made specifically for bathrooms, your bathroom will stay looking good for a much longer time. You don't have to remove your existing paint. Since you're going to have to repaint anyway, why not use the right kind of paint; a paint that uses a binder resin that's exceptionally resistant to moisture and also has mildewcides in it that will prevent mildew from growing on the paint for decades. (?)

Warning: I've noticed that Zinsser's PermaWhite Bathroom Paint forms a lot of tiny bubbles when applying it. I've managed this situation by blowing on the paint to break those bubbles before the paint dries, but it could be just that I'm using old paint. If you encounter this problem, thin your paint with water to allow those bubbles to break as the film dries. Or, use the Sherwin Williams offering.

I suspect the most likely cause was the fact that the humidity in the bathroom (from the first coat) interfered with the second coat drying properly. Zinsser recommends using two coats of their PermaWhite Bathroom Paint to ensure a large reserve of mildewcide in the paint film. So, if you use their paint, allow the first coat to dry completely before applying the second coat.

Post again if you want to know how latex paints form films.
 

Last edited by Nestor; 12-22-10 at 10:33 PM.
  #5  
Old 12-22-10, 11:02 PM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 1,199
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
thanks for the long reply nestor. But not sure how you came to conclusion that this was bathroom? I didn't say that anywhere and it is NOT a bathroom. The ceiling was in playroom and in kitchen, both of which are in addition and the rooms are not used at all. The wall was in new unused bedroom. The drying time for the kitchen was about a week between coats and the playroom was several weeks. The humidity in my house is low because if I set my furnace humidifier at 40%, it will never shut off so humidity is less than 40%. So I don't think dry time or humidity are problems.

I do think you are right about film formation. But I think I was just too slow and paint was already starting to dry when I would come along with wet paint for next row and go over the dry paint way too much. I thought it was good to blend the "new" row with "old" row, but if "old" row is already starting to dry then not such a good thing.
 
  #6  
Old 12-23-10, 04:07 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,090
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
It's best to do all the cut in first for each section. On a ceiling that would normally mean the whole thing, on walls - cut in and then roll one wall at a time.

When rolling, don't try to squeeze all the paint out of the roller. Apply the paint liberally and then reroll each stripe as the roller 'dries' up. New drywall often requires an extra coat to get it to look right. This is especially important when using cheaper coatings or enamel paint. I like a 1/2" nap for slick finished walls/ceilings because it holds more paint and the additional roller stipple is rarely ever noticed.

Generally flat paints touch up better than enamels but I have used some satin or eggshell enamels that touched up better than some flats. The line of vision can also be a factor. I've had a lot of success with touching up paint over the years but a lot of that is having experience both with paint in general and the particular coating being used.
 
  #7  
Old 12-23-10, 09:01 AM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 1,199
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I think I was probably squeezing too much paint out of roller. so you are saying do all the "sqaures" for a row (3 squares from top to bottom) and then go back over the whole row (all 3 sqaures) before moving to next row?

how often should I put on new roller and replace tray liner-or is it better if using 5gallon bucket to just use screen-that seems to put a lot more paint on roller since screen doesn't take much off. I noticed that as I paint I start getting little flakes of paint on the wall. I take them as soon as I see them so they are not ruining my finish. I think they are coming from paint drying of the tray liner and then being picked up in roller?
 
  #8  
Old 12-23-10, 03:02 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,090
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
You lost me on the 'squares'

The dried flakes of paint are likely coming from your roller tray. I almost always use a 5 gallon bucket to roll out of - it holds more paint and is faster

I usually use lambs wool covers and they last a long time if they are used and cleaned properly - they don't respond well to heavy pressure. When a roller cover gets worn out, it won't hold as much paint and might leave lines on the wall.
 
  #9  
Old 12-23-10, 03:57 PM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 1,199
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I meant the 3x3 squares you paint? That is what I have read everywhere-use a "w" or "n", fill it in, then finish up and down. move down to next square. so get about 3 squares to form each vertical row. so are you sawing when finsih row, go up and down whole wall before moving to next row?

and when you use the bucket for rolling-do you dip whole roller in the bucket? I used bucket when priming but wasn't sure if was supposed to dip whole thing in? thought that paint would fly everywhere. and it was messy enough doing ceiling since I did not use pole-just a step stool. I found when using pole I tended to twist it. friend said I need roller holder that clamps from both ends so it is weighted evenly. have at home depot that holds from 12" to 18" rollers. but I don't think a 12" will fit into bucket?
 
  #10  
Old 12-24-10, 03:58 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,090
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
I've used 18" rollers but never in residential work [it would be overkill], haven't seen the 12" rollers. Often a wheel barrow is used to dip an 18" roller in. They also make wide pans/trays to fit the wider roller.

I've never heard of the 3' squares and for the most part the N or W rolling pattern is garbage. The most effective way to roll is to take a roller full of paint and make 1 stripe and then reroll the previous stripe with the now drier roller. When using a 5 gal bucket, immerse the roller in paint almost 1/2 way but not enough to get the metal rod wet with paint, roll/spin the roller slightly on the grid/screen and get the other portion of the roller cover wet with paint. The idea is to get as much paint on the roller cover as possible without getting the frame wet.

You really need to use a roller pole. It will make painting easier and quicker. I think the reason you are twisting it is because you are using too much pressure. Use a light touch with the roller, let the roller do most of the work don't try to squeeze all the paint out of the roller!! Apply a heavy coat of paint and then lightly reroll it to smooth it out.
 
  #11  
Old 01-04-11, 04:59 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Livonia, Michigan
Posts: 203
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
When you paint a ceiling that has strong lighting across it, you have to use a "dead flat" paint. Many flats have a low angular glow or sheen to them. This low angle sheen will cause any defects in the substrate or application to show up.

You are seeing (most likely) lapping, and perhaps some directional rolling pattern on your ceiling. Some ceiling flat paints are prone to blochiness particularly if you double coat them.

You will find that the second coat of paint will always set up quicker than the first coat on paint - this can make lapping a nightmare on ceilings if you double coat.

I don't think you have any problems with proper film formation at all. You may have put the paint on too thinly (using a 3/8" roller nap). Thinly applied paint will set up quicker than properly applied paint (don't try to over-apply the paint too thickly either).

Most professional painters will use a 3/4" nap roller with flat paint on a ceiling. I would probably recommend a 1/2" cover to the DIY'er, and use an extension pole (don't hand roll ceilings from a step ladder). A four foot extension pole will work for most 8' ceilings.

Use a good flat paint if you decide to paint this ceiling again. I would reccomend Sherwin Williams Promar 400 flat for ceilings (or something similar) I use Promar 400 flat all the time where I need a flawless appearance and uniformity. Promar 400 doesn't have the exceptional hiding that a more expensive paint will have, but the extra hiding ability won't be needed when painting white over white (or color over same color). What you need here is uniformity, and a dead flat will go a long way toward correcting that.

Don't think in terms of "squares" when painting a ceiling. Think of dividing the ceiling into halves (or even thirds if the ceiling is very wide). Cut in the perimeter first, then roll it out. Roll out a three or four foot band on one half of the ceiling, then roll out the same on the other half of the ceiling joining the sections in the middle.

Then roll out the next three or four foot band .... in the same manner. Four foot bands, half the ceiling, alternating sides until the ceiling is done. If you do this you will keep a wet edge and avoid lapping. BUT a good dead flat paint is very forgiving even if you do get some dry lapping anyway so always use a dead flat on ceilings that have strong lighting across them. With small rooms and poorly lit rooms, you can get away with sheen paints and low sheen flats on the ceiling.

Don't over-roll and re-work areas on a ceiling. Roll it on, smooth the paint out - then leave it and move on. You don't need to race through it, but don't linger too long in one area either. Just work efficiently and methodically - and use a dead flat paint and all should go well. Try the Promar 400 flat I think you will see a great improvement in the final appearance.

One Final Note: As mentioned already, work methodically in applying the next coat paying close attention to avoid missed spots or "holidays" when painting white (of another manufacturer) over another white. Accomplish this by a methodical approach in your rolling using a good overlapping "v" pattern when putting the paint on and smoothing it out - rather than using a hap hazard random rolling approach.
 

Last edited by Slatz; 01-04-11 at 05:53 AM.
  #12  
Old 01-05-11, 05:32 AM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 1,199
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
You will find that the second coat of paint will always set up quicker than the first coat on paint - this can make lapping a nightmare on ceilings if you double coat.

I did notice that the paint seemed to dry VERY quickly when put second coat on. Seemed strange to me. It was like when primed and the drywall really seemed to suck it in. I was trying to put second coat on thick since I thought that I put first coat on too thin. But I did have mild flashing when I painted walls too. I was told by Behr that I should add a little water to paint to slow dry time. I recall it getting tacky when I was rolling over what was supposed to be my wet edge. Of course I think I am just too slow since I was cutting in at the same time between rows.

I think I got your paint pattern. but that seems like it would be harder to keep wet edge since you are painting band, then painting band on the other 1/2 of ceiling that is NOT next to the one you just painted, then coming back to paint a band next to the first strip. that would seem like more likely to lose wet edge than just painting band, then painting another band right next to first. maybe I am missing something or not quite understanding what you are saying?

it is hard to see where you have already painted when painting ceiling-particularly second coat. is there a trick to being able to see wet edge? I do have good 1500 watt work light but tricky getting lighting right so I see reflection off wet paint.
 
  #13  
Old 01-05-11, 07:43 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,090
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
Slatz is saying that if the ceiling is to wide to paint with 1 stripe, paint a few stripes on one half of the ceiling and then immediately go and roll the the corresponding few stripes on the other half. Since the cut in is done first, you should be able to maintain a wet edge this way. Thinning the paint slightly will slow down the drying time but might also affect the coverage. You can also add flood's floetrol or XIM's extends to latex paint to slow down the drying time.

If you get used to working with a wet roller [no dry rolling] you don't have to rely on a light to tell where you've been - wet paint is always shinier than dry paint. Remembering where you stopped and started also helps
 
  #14  
Old 01-05-11, 11:02 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Livonia, Michigan
Posts: 203
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Yes, that is exactly what I mean. Roll out a four foot band on one side, go to the other side and do the same joining the painted sections in the middle. Keep alternating side to side in this manner until the ceiling is done. You cut the ceiling in first around the perimeter because you won't notice any lapping (with most properly formulated flat paints) around the perimeter. If you cut in as you roll, it will slow you down too much, and then you may get lapping in the middle of the ceiling etc.. where it will be noticeable.

Remember, a properly formulated, dead flat paint is more forgiving in terms of lap marks, that is why I suggest you try Sherwin Williams Promar 400 flat.

The paint that is now on the ceiling is probably very porous and now is drawing the moisture and vehicle of the subsequent coats of paint into it. I have noticed this issue with some ceiling paints in the past. You really need to prime them first to seal them, before recoating. This "wicking" effect of these ceiling paints may have something to do with the extender pigments used in the paint formulation too.

Note: The flashing on the walls is different from the ceiling flashing. Flashing is just a generic term for "blotchiness" in this case.

The uneven sheen on the walls will be corrected by another coat of the eggshell paint. It usually takes two coats of sheen paint over primed drywall for good hold out and sheen uniformity.

You can get "lost" on a ceiling if you don't go at it with a structured approach. Using a 1500 watt light might help, but for me, daylight and a good methodical rolling pattern should prevent holidays, skips and misses. Wet paint will look (slightly) different in color as well, than the previous dry paint.
 

Last edited by Slatz; 01-05-11 at 11:25 PM.
  #15  
Old 01-14-11, 08:22 AM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 1,199
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
slatz, just read last post. guess I didn't get email and didn't see it before. interesting thing is you mention about the ceiling paint being porous. I just yesterday spoke with sherwin williams to see about the promar 400. I also asked specifically about ceiling paint for bathroom since high humidity. the man told me not to use flat paint in bath since it is too porous. said to use the promar 400, but in a semi or eggshell finish. would you agree with that? and yeh, the second coat did seem to dry much faster than I was expecting so the porousness issue sounds correct. hate to prime again, but I guess only way to fix it now?
 
  #16  
Old 01-14-11, 12:31 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,090
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
You were told correctly, flat paint shouldn't be used in a bath rm. A latex enamel is bare minimum, a kitchen and bath enamel is better. K&B paints are formulated for the harsher environment, including extra mildewcide.

I prefer the promar 200 line of paint but have used the 400 just for ceilings with good results. The 200 generally covers better than the 400. Ironically, about the only time, I've ever had issues with paint on a ceiling is when I've used the 'ceiling paints' I suspect it's an application issue on my part - I do tend to be fairly liberal with the application of the paint.
 
  #17  
Old 01-14-11, 11:58 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Livonia, Michigan
Posts: 203
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
You can get away with a sheen paint in a bathroom since most bathroom ceilings are small. You don't get a good viewing angle on the ceiling so the lap marks etc.. (if you have a poor application of the paint) are not noticed. Lap marks and directional roller pattern is usually only noticed when you look at the ceiling from an angle (especially when the light source i.e. window is directly opposite from your viewing position). The smaller the ceiling, the easier it is to paint, so you will have less problems with small ceilings.

You should use a sheen paint in a bathroom - at least a satin sheen (or higher), flat paints are porous and humidity from showers can penetrate through them fairly easily.

Promar 200 has better hide. Promar 400 is a "flater" - flat. So if you need perfect uniformity on a long ceiling where the light really shines across it - I would use the 400 flat. Otherwise 200 flat will work. I use both.

BTW: you said in one of your posts that this ceiling was not a bathroom (see quote)

"how you came to conclusion that this was bathroom? I didn't say that anywhere and it is NOT a bathroom. The ceiling was in playroom and in kitchen"
 
  #18  
Old 01-15-11, 07:24 AM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 1,199
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
thanks. yeh, what I already painted and had problems with was NOT in the bathroom. I am just trying to think in advance for my bath based on what I have learned. Now the problem I have is that I used Behr new drywall primer everywhere. apparently, you can only topcoat over that with flat or eggshell--think maybe that should be better advertised besides the little line on the back of the container!! so if I am using say a satin or semigloss in kitchen or bath, I should have used #75 primer! so I guess I gotta reprime those areas. I had new drywall so I figured should used the one labeled new drywall primer-seemed logical to me! should have used general primer in these areas. this is really frustrating.

now my addition has the kitchen and family room next to each other with a bar area separating them. there is a step up in ceiling height of about 4" as you go from kitchen into family room. so paint the kitchen ceiling satin or semi and the family room flat? now kitchen has no windows (the dining room on one side has skylight and lot of windows and has large opening between the rooms) but since you can stand away in family room and look at angle into the kitchen is that going to be problem with satin or semi on ceiling?
 
  #19  
Old 01-15-11, 07:44 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Livonia, Michigan
Posts: 203
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I am not familiar with the primer, but it should be recoatable with any latex paint. You may have to double coat with the sheen paint for good uniformity. If you have to do this on the ceiling and it is a small one, you will be fine. If the ceiling is large, add Floetrol (read label for amounts and directions) for better holdout and uniformity on the second coat.

Kitchen ceilings don't have to be painted in sheen paint (the walls can be sheen paint and ceiling flat). They are not subject to high humidity. Sheen paints will wipe up better - if you splash the spaghetti sauce up on the ceiling, but many people use sheen or flat in the kitchen. So I would use which ever you think you can make work. I, of course, (being a highly trained professional) could make either work. But, if you need to do flat for appearance - do flat.

BTW: A kitchen with no windows or light shinning across the ceiling will probably go well with satin or semi.

Q. "but since you can stand away in family room and look at angle into the kitchen is that going to be problem with satin or semi on ceiling?"
A. You usually need a light source shinning across the ceiling to cause problems. It is particularly problematic, if the light source is directly opposite your viewing position.
 
  #20  
Old 01-17-11, 05:02 PM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 1,199
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Just trying to digest everything that has been said so I can come up with plan. Said that for ceilings that had flashing after second coat that I should reprime those areas and then topcoat again. but later you said that if areas require second coat add Floetrol to slow dry time. so should I reprime or just re-topcoat adding floetrol?

in bath, should use satin or semi due to the high humidity. But behr says that the primer I used will cause bad flashing problem if use any sheen greater than eggshell. So you say I could just topcoat over the incorrect primer and if need second coat add Floetrol to paint OR according to Behr, reprime with “correct” primer in bath and the topcoat with satin or semi. So here is kinda what I was thinking:

Kitchen ceiling-already coated ceiling with 2 coats of flat ceiling paint but looks very streaky, flashing. should I reprime and then topcoat again with flat (since you say humidity shouldn’t be issue in this room and will tell wife not to splatter ceiling!) and if need second coat add floetrol? or just re-topcoat adding floetrol?

Bathroom- primed but not yet painted. Will use satin or semi on ceiling and walls, but according to Behr, the primer I used should not be used with satin finish. So either just topcoat with satin or semi and if need to recoat add Floetrol OR reprime with “correct” primer and topcoat satin or semi?

Bathroom toilet room ceiling—this is room in bath where toilet is located. It has own door. I already primed it and painted it with ceiling flat. looks fine.. Should I paint it satin with rest of bath ceiling? Or being own room with door, will humidity not be issue in here?

Shower ceiling- Already painted ceiling using ceiling flat. Will Reprime with correct primer and paint satin

Bedroom ceiling—primed and painted ceiling with 2 coats of ceiling flat but lot of flashing. Reprime and then topcoat adding Floetrol?

Bedroom walls. Primed and painted eggshell. Little bit of flashing. Just recoat and add Floetrol.

Laundry room-should this be satin or semi on walls and ceiling? Didn’t know if humidity issue here . if not I guess could use flat on ceiling but maybe still want satin or semi on walls just for durability here and for splashes on walls from washtub, correct?
 
  #21  
Old 01-18-11, 04:09 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,090
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
Personally, I wouldn't reprime any of the walls/ceilings that already have a top coat applied but it's possible repriming might make repainting easier for a diyer. Floetrol slows down the drying time of latex paints. It's mostly used when using latex enamels in quick drying conditions but can be used with most latex paints. It can be beneficial for those with limitted painting skils because the slower drying time helps the paint to flow together better.

The biggest issue with applying enamel over the wrong primer is the cheaper primer may not hold out a consistent sheen with enamel. A 2nd coat of enamel almost always corrects this issue and that is how I'd proceed.

The main reason for using an enamel on the walls and ceilings of bath rooms is the steam from the shower. 2 coats of latex enamel over the shower will be just as effective as repriming and 1 coat of enamel. The separate room for the commode may not need the enamel but if steam gets into that room also........ Persoanally, I'd use enamel on the laundry rm walls - it will be easier to keep them clean.
 
  #22  
Old 01-23-11, 11:12 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Livonia, Michigan
Posts: 203
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Don't use the same ceiling flat paint again even if you decide to use Floetrol, switch to Promar 400. You can thank me later......
 
  #23  
Old 01-29-11, 04:44 AM
J
Member
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 15
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Too many lengthy replies. The original problem is now lost in translation.
 
  #24  
Old 01-30-11, 05:54 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,090
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
John - what exactly do you need clarified?
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: