Peeling Trim Paint


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Old 03-19-11, 11:34 AM
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Peeling Trim Paint

Hey Everyone!

My first post here. I see lots of good advice. Hope that someone here can help.

Here's the issue: I have a semi-gloss trim that I would like to paint over. I painted over a decent size section of it with flat paint, no primer or anything else, for the sake of seeing if I like the color. That paint is now peeling off. I can scrape it off with a putty knife or my finger nail. The trim is a complex surface, so scraping it all off is not an easy thing.

I have 2 questions:

1. What should I do with the paint that wont stick? If I should remove it, what is the best way?

2. What is the best way to prepare the surface so that I can paint another semi-gloss finished paint over it. (Assume existing paint and new paint are both latex water based)

Thanks!
Pat
 
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Old 03-19-11, 02:35 PM
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You have to remove the paint that is peeling. I would scrape first, then sand.
 
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Old 03-19-11, 02:40 PM
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Welcome to the forums Pat!

I'd rather not assume the existing paint is latex as an oil base enamel would cause the peeling
http://forum.doityourself.com/painti...latex-oil.html

Generally a light scuff sanding will allow quality flat latex paint to adhere without any issues to latex enamel. Did you happen to use one of those small sample paint cans - they're kind of cheap and not formulated for wear or adhesion over tricky surfaces.

Aggressive sanding should remove any paint that isn't stuck good enough. I'd start with 80 grit - that should remove what needs to come off, then use 120 or 150 grit to sand out any sanding scratches. You could also use lacquer thinner or a product like 'oops' or 'goof off' to dissolve and remove the flat paint - but if the underlying paint is latex, it might partially dissolve it too

If the existing enamel trim paint is oil base - you'll need to use an oil base primer before you can switch over to latex.
 
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Old 03-19-11, 03:34 PM
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I would also think that a latex conversion primer something like Zinsser's Bullseye 123 would work as well. Would remove the need for an oil based primer. Easier to work with for a DIY.

Other than that, I'd agree with everything Marksr said. Oil based primer would obviously work as well, just messier to work with and clean up is a pain.
 
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Old 03-20-11, 01:33 AM
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Oil based is suicidal & I doubt it's needed.
 
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Old 03-20-11, 08:28 AM
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Right on. Thanks for the good input. You're right, it was one of those sample colors. Looks like I have some work to do, and some things things to figure out before I paint, but better to do the rest right and not have to deal with this again.

You guys Rock!

Pat
 
 

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