Question About Removing Runs In Primer & Filling in Spots Missed Before Painting


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Old 04-12-11, 10:49 AM
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Question About Removing Runs In Primer & Filling in Spots Missed Before Painting

Over the last week or so I've been following the expert advice of some people on this forum to strip wallpaper from the bathroom walls and prepare them for paint.

Here are steps I've taken so far in the order I've done them in:

-strip wallpaper and residue using water and a putty knife
-removing as much glue as possible with water and a sponge
-paint the walls with Gardz
-fill in and sand with 120 as many gouges, nail holes and imperfections as possible with all purpose joint compound
-vacuum and tack cloth off all sanding dust from the walls
-prime the walls with Zinsser 123

Now that the primer has dried I have a couple of additional "how to" questions.

1. I've noticed a couple of runs in the primer that I need to remove before painting and I'm not sure of the best way to handle them? Will they sand out?

2. I have also noticed a couple of gouges that I filled in which need a little more filling and sanding before painting and wonder what's the best way to handle these?

Thanks again for the assistance.
 
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Old 04-12-11, 01:09 PM
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I think you can sand primer easily. If its too hard to sand with sandpaper you can probably remove the runs with a putty knife and then prime again if necessary.
I think that a good way to handle deep holes before plastering is to first use a primer. This will reduce the moisture absorption from the plaster with result the plaster to fill holes more effectively. If you plaster them once, let the plaster dry and then plaster them again you can check the progress as it goes if you need to apply a 3rd of 4th layer of plaster until when it dries you can sand it to make it flat. If the holes are very deep then you might want to use a mortar-type plaster and not an acrylic or resin plaster. Mortar type plaster though does not have a smooth finish so you will probably need to apply some other type of plaster (like acrylic or resin) over it after. Again applying a primer before plastering I think its a good idea. There are also specific primers that are ment to be used as an underlayer for plaster.
 
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Old 04-12-11, 01:53 PM
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Thanks Volnix for your comments.

I will try sanding the primer to see if that works. If not, I'll try a putty knife.

As previously recommended, I put Gardz on the walls before attempting to fill and repair any gouges and marks in the walls. That was based on my understanding that it would seal any glue residue remaining from the old wallpaper as well as seal the walls to eliminate any moisture absorption created from applying joint compound to the areas I was repairing and skim coating.

If it makes any difference, I'm dealing with drywall not plaster walls.
 
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Old 04-12-11, 02:26 PM
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Use sanding cloth not sand paper. Sanding cloth will not load up like sand paper. You will also need a sanding pad for that type paper. There sold in the drywall area in any box store.
For any tiny low spots use Fast and Final or any light weight patching compound. It's sold in the paint dept. at any hardware store of Lowes and HD. You will know when you have the right one in your hand the plastic container will feel empty it's so light weight.
 
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Old 04-14-11, 08:39 AM
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Any reason I can't use the all purpose joint compound I already have to fill in any low or noticeable spots?

Thanks again
 
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Old 04-18-11, 06:59 AM
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While the light weight mud is easier to work with there is no reason you can't use the all purpose.

I wouldn't bother trying to sand the runs out - latex paint/primer doesn't sand well. It would be easier and quicker to scrape off the runs, apply a small amount of j/c, sand and prime when dry.
 
 

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