Painting Kitchen Cabinets - Spray vs Roller & Brush


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Old 04-16-11, 03:29 PM
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Painting Kitchen Cabinets - Spray vs Roller & Brush

I'm in the process of prepping some "donated" kitchen cabinets for my kitchen remodel and I'm wondering what will yield the best results. The cabinets are not currently installed, so I hope to be able to arrange them in my workspace so I can paint all of them without having to move them.

They are oak with a lighter "honey" color stain. I spent today sanding with 80 grit and have the majority of the visible surfaces down to bare wood. Should I take any further steps prior to priming other than ensuring everything is sanded?

What I'm planning on using is Sherwin Williams Multi-Purpose Oil-Based Primer (Pink Can) and Sherwin Williams All Surface Enamel Acrylic Latex (Teal Can). This was what was recommended by the SW salesperson. According to him this paint will take close to 30 days to fully cure, he recommended not playing with it too much before then. My current plan is to prime at least one coat, maybe two depending on the results of the first. Then put on two coats of color, wiping down with steel wool in between coats, with the coats about a day or two apart.

Now for the method of application. According to the SW guy, this paint should lay out really flat if I do brush/roll it, but of course it'll be smoother if I spray. Looking at the can the spray specs call for an airless at 1500PSI with a .017"-.021" tip. I don't have access to an airless sprayer. What I had originally planned on using was an older Binks bottom feed spray gun. I'm not too familiar with spraying, other than spraying some test panels to setup the gun then letting it rip. Any suggestions?

Thanks in advance!
 
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Old 04-17-11, 07:55 AM
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One of the Pro's should be around...but I wouldn't use steel wool. A synthetic abrasive pad or sand paper might be better...if it's even needed at all.
 
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Old 04-17-11, 08:04 AM
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If you have never used a sprayer much then this is not a good job to try it on. It's going to be in plan view. And a bottom feed gun will not be the way to go any way.
A foam roller and a quality sash brush would work better.
Never use steel wool it will leave tiny flakes of metal behind that will rust up.
use 220 grit paper instead.
Before painting wipe the cabinets down with mineral spirits.
 
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Old 04-17-11, 01:15 PM
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Originally Posted by joecaption View Post
If you have never used a sprayer much then this is not a good job to try it on. It's going to be in plan view. And a bottom feed gun will not be the way to go any way.
A foam roller and a quality sash brush would work better.
Never use steel wool it will leave tiny flakes of metal behind that will rust up.
use 220 grit paper instead.
Before painting wipe the cabinets down with mineral spirits.
Well, this is why I posted here. Thanks for the advice!

I was reading elsewhere about using "brushing putty" on these prior to priming to fill any grain and prevent any bleed through. I had never heard of this stuff before. Any thoughts?
 
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Old 04-18-11, 06:34 AM
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An airless can be rented but it is more involved than just pulling the trigger. A conventional gun that runs off of an air compressor is not suitable for spraying latex paint. Adding some floetrol or extender to the latex paint will slow the drying time down allowing the paint to flow together better. Sanding between coats also helps to eliminate/reduce brush marks or roller stipple.

Your prep so far sounds good. The sanding dust does need to be removed. I like to use a rag wet with liquid deglosser instead of mineral spirits but either will work. Do NOT use steel wool - any steel particles left on the surface can and will turn up as rust from the water in latex paint! I'd use 180-220 grit sandpaper.

Latex paint will fill the grain better than the oil primer will. I don't think the open grain will be a big issue since the wood has been sealed with poly and will be primed and painted 2 coats with latex. I've not used or heard of 'brushing putty' Floor finishers use a paste that fills the grain [and minor cracks] I have used joint compound for small areas of open grain - basically applying a thin coat and then sanding it ALL off, just leaving a small amount in the grain itself.
 
 

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