ridges and brush marks on cabinets


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Old 04-20-11, 08:38 AM
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ridges and brush marks on cabinets

I am also painting Kitchen cabinets that already have a light honey color stain on them. I used 150 sandpaper to rough them up slightly. My question is about the ridge around the outer edge of the doors which leaves a raised 1 to 2 inch piece around the edges as a design of sorts. I am using a foam roller for the majority of the flat surface except will have to use a brush for these ridges. what is the best way to smooth out the paint evenly on these ridges without leaving visible brush marks which i have already noticed when applying the primer??
 
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Old 04-20-11, 10:04 AM
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latex paint starts drying as soon as you put it on thats why you end up with brush marks. They sell an additive for latex paint to slow down the drying so the paint can flow out and the brush marks disappear. It works to some extent but you might still have a few. For that reason when I remodeled my house i used oil based trim paint. It dries a lot slower and the flows together and the brush marks disappear. Benjamin Moore makes it and its the best trim paint. Its called Impervo. They do make a latex version also but I used the paint additive with it and it looked better then most latex paints but still not as good as the oil based Impervo. Also if you spray the paint on you dont have to worry about brush marks with latex or oil paint but the oil paint will be more durable.
 
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Old 04-20-11, 10:18 AM
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Don't forget you need to start with a primer! more than likely a solvent based primer. That will insure adhesion to the previous finish.

Oil base enamels do flow together better than their latex counterpart but a lot depends on the brush being used and your skill level. It's always a good idea to sand between coats - this helps to reduce/eliminate brush marks and promotes good adhesion.

Oil base enamel dries harder than latex but light colors [especially whites] tend to yellow over time. Latex enamel won't yellow but doesn't wear as well. IMO the best choice is to use one of the new waterborne enamels. They dry fast and almost as hard as oil base. Some report it's harder to apply although I've had no issues with it's application.

If you intend to roll the finish, it's best to do all your brush work on the door and then roll it. The slight roller stipple will make the majority of the brush marks disappear.
 
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Old 04-20-11, 11:14 AM
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Well first off I already said at the end of my first post that I was using primer. The primer is call Valspar multi-purpose latex primer that says on the tin its good for glossy surfaces without the need of sanding which i did anyways. The foam roller will not get close enough to the ridges to smooth the primer used on the ridges. The paint that will be used is called Para ultra cabinet and furniture paint thats acrylic latex. The brush is a multi-purpose brush. So hope these further details help clear up any confusion. Another question aside from the brush marks is should I use two coats of primer???
 
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Old 04-20-11, 01:40 PM
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my uncle just painted his house with valspar and it took 3 coats. he said it was the worst paint he had ever used.
 
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Old 04-20-11, 01:41 PM
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Generally 1 coat of primer is enough, it's main job is to provide adhesion for the top coat. If you sand out the brush marks and remove the primer in the process - those areas would need additional primer. I don't have much confidence in latex primers over glossy solvent based paints/polys - hopefully your primer will preform ok for you.

I'm not real familiar with paints from Lowes but it may be beneficial to thin the paint slightly or use an additive like floetrol. 2 thinner coats of paint are almost always preferable to 1 thick coat.
 
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Old 04-20-11, 01:46 PM
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Danny, I'm sure Valspar like most paint manufactures has several lines of paint both good and bad. I'm partial to SWP and their top of the line coatings are as good as any but their bargain basement coating are also as bad as any
I applied a good bit of Valspar exterior oil house paint 40 or so yrs ago and it was good paint, I've not used much of it in a long time and can't personally attest to it's quality today.
 
 

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