best way to paint edges on the wall

Reply

  #1  
Old 04-26-11, 10:25 AM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: united states
Posts: 62
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
best way to paint edges on the wall

i've to do painting in my house.
i've done it before with 1/2inch angle brush to line the edges and corners.
masking tape was quite hard for me as it sticks and hard to peel afterwards.
so i found better way to use 1/2inch angle brush to line the edges.

i've to do like 7rooms and planning to do in shorter and faster and efficient way to do it.

is there better tools or ways to go thru' edges on the walls as i can go faster...finishing my project.
would be glad to hear.
thanks as always for helping me...
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-26-11, 02:24 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,704
Received 330 Votes on 293 Posts
I couldn't imagine cutting in with just a 1/2" brush I'd probably use a 3" brush but for most diyers - a 2" sash [angle] brush works best. How much are you paying for your brush? I'd have a hard time cutting in with most any dime store brush. A quality brush is key - the rest just takes practice. I like the Purdy line of brushes although there are some other brands just as good.

Tape is rarely a good idea, it gives false confidence and paint will almost always seep under the tape. Tape must be removed immediately to prevent it from peeling off some of the newly applied paint
 
  #3  
Old 04-26-11, 02:31 PM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: united states
Posts: 62
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Marksr,
thanks for your help as always.
yes i've already got purdue 2inch angle.

i'll completely avoid tape. we tried in our old house after half done we didn't bother anymore. too much work and seeping inside.

how about the sides of the doors and windows...everywhere you think its best to go with 2inch brush?

thanks

Originally Posted by marksr View Post
I couldn't imagine cutting in with just a 1/2" brush I'd probably use a 3" brush but for most diyers - a 2" sash [angle] brush works best. How much are you paying for your brush? I'd have a hard time cutting in with most any dime store brush. A quality brush is key - the rest just takes practice. I like the Purdy line of brushes although there are some other brands just as good.

Tape is rarely a good idea, it gives false confidence and paint will almost always seep under the tape. Tape must be removed immediately to prevent it from peeling off some of the newly applied paint
 
  #4  
Old 04-27-11, 05:37 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,704
Received 330 Votes on 293 Posts
Generally it's best to paint all the woodwork [except the baseboard] first as it's easier to cut the wall paint into the sides of the wood trim than the other way around.
 
  #5  
Old 04-27-11, 10:17 AM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: united states
Posts: 62
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
so basically paint all the windows and doors first then go with the wall ..leaving baseboad at the end, right?

also, is there better way to work around to paint the baseboard as it is hard to get bottom of the baseboard since the carpet been already installed?

glad to hear.
thanks much.
 
  #6  
Old 04-27-11, 11:13 AM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,585
Received 94 Votes on 83 Posts
You're painting the baseboard? If I've read that correctly, I'd pull it off the wall and paint it in the garage.
 
  #7  
Old 04-27-11, 01:13 PM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: united states
Posts: 62
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by mitch17 View Post
You're painting the baseboard? If I've read that correctly, I'd pull it off the wall and paint it in the garage.
can you clear it out??????
 
  #8  
Old 04-27-11, 01:34 PM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,585
Received 94 Votes on 83 Posts
OK, I'd paint it in the driveway
 
  #9  
Old 04-27-11, 03:29 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,704
Received 330 Votes on 293 Posts
I've never uninstalled base to paint it. On a repaint with carpet, I'll run 2" tape along the carpet pressing the carpet pile down. Then carefully cut the baseboard in. That way the paint can't seep under the tape and ruin the carpet or stick to the fibers as it dries.
 
  #10  
Old 04-27-11, 03:31 PM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: united states
Posts: 62
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by marksr View Post
I've never uninstalled base to paint it. On a repaint with carpet, I'll run 2" tape along the carpet pressing the carpet pile down. Then carefully cut the baseboard in. That way the paint can't seep under the tape and ruin the carpet or stick to the fibers as it dries.
thanks for the info.
i'll try it.
 
  #11  
Old 04-27-11, 11:04 PM
N
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Canada
Posts: 448
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Cool:

I agree with Marksr about using masking tape to tape off the carpet. When I've done this, there was enough give in the carpet that I could get the edge of the tape under the baseboard, and that worked well for me. The whole tape would pull off the carpet without difficulty.

I own a small apartment block and so I do more painting than most homeowners. What I've done is paint ALL of my wood trim (baseboards, door frames, window sills and the interiors of closets with a durable oil based paint (which WILL yellow in areas where there isn't plenty of natural light)). That's because these areas generally never need to have nail holes repaired in them, and can be brought back to looking good just with cleaning. It's painting all of this woodwork that makes repainting a real chore.

And, when I repaint an apartment, I'm only painting the walls (and maybe the ceilings) and I'm generally repainting with the same colour of paint. So, to make the cutting in go much faster I use a piece of sheet metal and a 3 inch wide roller. I wrap two widths of 2 inch wide painter's masking tape around the edge of the sheet metal which I bend into the corner I want to cut in. I've learned from experience that I can't start right at the sheet metal with a fully loaded roller because the paint will be squeezed under the edge of the sheet metal onto the surface I want to avoid painting. So, I start about a foot away with the roller and SPREAD the paint into the corner protected by the sheet metal. Since the old paint and new paint are similar in colour, only an eagle could tell that the cut in line isn't as sharp and crisp as it could be.

The painter's masking tape on the piece of sheet metal will eventually get all mucked up with partially dried paint. You then peel off that old tape and apply new tape and you're good to go again. Using these methods I can do all the cutting in in a 850 square foot two bedroom suite in one working day, and then paint all the walls with 3, 7 and 10 inch rollers the next day. The only place I use a 1/2 inch brush is in the 4 corners of each wall or ceiling which is inaccessible to a roller.

Hope this helps.
 
  #12  
Old 04-28-11, 09:55 AM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,585
Received 94 Votes on 83 Posts
My baseboard is all stained, so I'm generally stripping it before restaining and finishing

With Mark's tip, I wouldn't pull the baseboard to paint it either
 
  #13  
Old 04-28-11, 05:40 PM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: united states
Posts: 62
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Nestor View Post
Cool:

I agree with Marksr about using masking tape to tape off the carpet. When I've done this, there was enough give in the carpet that I could get the edge of the tape under the baseboard, and that worked well for me. The whole tape would pull off the carpet without difficulty.

I own a small apartment block and so I do more painting than most homeowners. What I've done is paint ALL of my wood trim (baseboards, door frames, window sills and the interiors of closets with a durable oil based paint (which WILL yellow in areas where there isn't plenty of natural light)). That's because these areas generally never need to have nail holes repaired in them, and can be brought back to looking good just with cleaning. It's painting all of this woodwork that makes repainting a real chore.

And, when I repaint an apartment, I'm only painting the walls (and maybe the ceilings) and I'm generally repainting with the same colour of paint. So, to make the cutting in go much faster I use a piece of sheet metal and a 3 inch wide roller. I wrap two widths of 2 inch wide painter's masking tape around the edge of the sheet metal which I bend into the corner I want to cut in. I've learned from experience that I can't start right at the sheet metal with a fully loaded roller because the paint will be squeezed under the edge of the sheet metal onto the surface I want to avoid painting. So, I start about a foot away with the roller and SPREAD the paint into the corner protected by the sheet metal. Since the old paint and new paint are similar in colour, only an eagle could tell that the cut in line isn't as sharp and crisp as it could be.

The painter's masking tape on the piece of sheet metal will eventually get all mucked up with partially dried paint. You then peel off that old tape and apply new tape and you're good to go again. Using these methods I can do all the cutting in in a 850 square foot two bedroom suite in one working day, and then paint all the walls with 3, 7 and 10 inch rollers the next day. The only place I use a 1/2 inch brush is in the 4 corners of each wall or ceiling which is inaccessible to a roller.

Hope this helps.
Thanks Nestor. i'll try it.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: