Staining Tongue & Groove Cedar Siding


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Old 05-12-11, 05:33 PM
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Staining Tongue & Groove Cedar Siding

I am using a semi-transparent weatherproofing wood stain that I will apply with a paint pad and back-brushing. What is the proper way of painting the groove? Do you paint it with the brush, apply paint to the board with the pad and then back-brush or paint the board with the pad and paint the groove when back brushing?
 
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Old 05-13-11, 03:48 AM
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Is the siding smooth enough for a pad to be a viable option?

I've always either sprayed and back brushed or applied the stain with a brush. It's important to keep a wet edge - that means you need to stain just a few boards at time and run them all the way across. That prevents the stain from drying before you stain the next move. If the stain starts to dry before you stain the next section the result will be unsightly lap marks.
 
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Old 05-13-11, 04:41 AM
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Yes it is smooth and runs vertically.
 
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Old 05-13-11, 04:47 AM
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I don't think it makes a whole lot of difference if you cut in before or after although cutting in before would allow you to not have to rebrush what you applied with the pad. I am a little concerned that just applying the stain with a pad might not apply enough stain to give long lasting results. The main thing is to maintain a wet edge - so stain just a few boards [top to bottom] at a time.
 
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Old 05-13-11, 10:24 AM
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I'd skip the pad and just brush it all
 
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Old 05-13-11, 11:52 AM
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... or use a roller to apply the stain and then take the brush to smooth it out and get the areas the roller missed. Pads work great for flat interior wood but I've never attempted to use one of the exterior - I'm not certain that it would apply enough stain to get a lasting job.
 
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Old 05-14-11, 04:31 AM
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I agree that a brush is probably the best way but I stained my shed with a 6" brush and painted myself and the drop cloth at the same time. The pad that I used is a 9" Shur-Line deck pad that can be used on siding, fences, concrete & brick. It has a heavier nap that holds more stain than the thinner nap used for painting interior walls. I finished half the job yesterday. I applied the stain with the pad to the siding, used the edge of the pad for the grooves and then back-brushed the grooves and siding.
 
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Old 05-14-11, 04:46 AM
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"I stained my shed with a 6" brush and painted myself and the drop cloth at the same time"

I've heard that called a 3 coat job - 1 on the wall, 1 on you and 1 on the floor

Back brushing like you are should result in a better job
 
 

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