Primer/Sealer before texture

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Old 06-25-11, 09:13 AM
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Primer/Sealer before texture

Bathroom remodel, new sheetrock on ceilings and walls. Salesperson in paint department strongly suggested using a primer/sealer before texturing, after texture then paint. Any input appreciated!!.
 
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Old 06-25-11, 01:23 PM
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If you prime before texture, the texture will dry at an even rate. The texture will also appear whiter. The texture needs to be primed! I rarely ever prime before texture since it needs to be primed after the texture dries. The uneven drying rate doesn't mean anything - the raw drywall areas will dry first, where the j/c is will take a little longer but the texture will still look the same other than it will be whiter where the mud was.

It doesn't hurt anything to prime prior to texture but the benefits are slight. It is important to prime the texture. That gives the paint a good base to adhere to and will make the top coat look better.

What type of paint will you be using? Latex enamel is bare minimum for bath rm walls/ceilings - bath rm paint is better. The sheen isn't too important, all enamels will repel water. Bath paints have extra mildewcide and are formulated for the harsher environment of a bath rm with shower.
 
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Old 06-25-11, 02:48 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post

What type of paint will you be using? Latex enamel is bare minimum for bath rm walls/ceilings - bath rm paint is better. The sheen isn't too important, all enamels will repel water. Bath paints have extra mildewcide and are formulated for the harsher environment of a bath rm with shower.
Appreciate the information, since there's minimal benefit of primer/sealer before texturing then don't see a need. Total novice when it comes to painting; having said that, did purchase the small Graco airless, primarily for exterior siding, and the small Wagner electric type for small projects. Not familair w/ the types of paints, searched online and did not see any reference to 'bathroom' paints, assume it would of the mildew resistant variety, and if understand correctly at the top of the list would be a brand name premium enamel, see where Consumer Report gave a highly favorable rating to an interior enamel carried by local Home Emprovement outlet store. Again, thank you for the info; I found it very helpful!!. dave
 
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Old 06-26-11, 03:57 AM
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Some brands will call it a kitchen and bath enamel while others will just label it as a bath rm enamel. Zinnser's Perma White is probably the best bath rm paint but it can only take a small amount of tint so the colors are limited. Most any paint store will have a bath enamel, I don't know if a big box would or not.

I'm not sure how you intend to apply the paint/primer in your bath rm but an airless wouldn't be a good idea. While I've normally sprayed the primer in new construction, 1 room or a small addition isn't a good candidate for spraying. In fact I rarely spray anything in an occupied dwelling - there is just too much prep and clean up work involved. Overspray can and will travel a long ways
 
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Old 06-26-11, 07:52 AM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
Some brands will call it a kitchen and bath enamel while others will just label it as a bath rm enamel. Zinnser's Perma White is probably the best bath rm paint but it can only take a small amount of tint so the colors are limited. Most any paint store will have a bath enamel, I don't know if a big box would or not.

I'm not sure how you intend to apply the paint/primer in your bath rm but an airless wouldn't be a good idea. While I've normally sprayed the primer in new construction, 1 room or a small addition isn't a good candidate for spraying. In fact I rarely spray anything in an occupied dwelling - there is just too much prep and clean up work involved. Overspray can and will travel a long ways
As the bathroom becomes functional; i.e., sink, bath, toilet, tile, I can now see where prep can be labor intensive, imagine there's alot of prepping when it comes to texturing; anyhow, intend purchasing some rollers and brushes. Thanks again for the heads-up!!
 
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