Thinning stain?


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Old 09-09-11, 04:26 PM
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Thinning stain?

I'm staining a new wooden privacy fence with Sherwin Williams' Exterior Woodscapes House Stain, Exterior Acrylic Solid Color (Ember in color).

The coverage for this stain is supposed to be 200-400 square feet according to the label. I did my figures on 300 square feet, right in the middle of the supposed coverage.

I figured I would have 7,200 square feet to stain.

That's 75 panels front and back at 6' tall by 8' wide.

7,200 divided by 300 is 24. I bought 25 gallons of stain.

Well, dad and I have stained 13 panels front and back and another 5 panels just one side. We've used 9 gallons already!!!!

By our calculations we will need an additional 10 gallons at the rate we're going.

I've read the label and it doesn't say anything about thinning it, but I was wondering if we could do that without any adverse effects to the stain but be able to make what we have go farther.

I really don't want to not stain some of the fencing as that would look quite bad, but I'd hate to shell out another $40/gallon for some more stain. I've spent a bunch of money on this fence already. All new pre-assembled panels, stainless steel posts, four full pallets of concrete, metal brackets, galvanized bolts, stain, etc. etc. etc. I've got about $6k in this already.

By the way, we're spraying it with a Titan airless sprayer. I'm spraying a somewhat wet first coat, having dad back roll it and then I come back and give it a lighter coat and call it good. This method seems to be the most common practice and it does appear to be covering real well. We're not painters, though. Just DIY'ers! Are we doing something wrong? Is there something we could do to stretch what stain we have left?

Help!!! Please!

Thanks, ya'll!
 
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Old 09-09-11, 04:40 PM
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1-800-4-SHERWIN

I would ask them directly.
 
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Old 09-09-11, 05:20 PM
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After it's been backrolled, call it good.
 
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Old 09-09-11, 05:46 PM
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Yes, I suspect you are doing something wrong.

My first suspicion is that you are attempting to achieve 100% even coverage on the first application. Better, you should be applying at the 300 SF/gal rate then backbrush/roll as suggested above. You aren't applying paint and oil based stains will even out over time (5 to 30 days) on their own.
 
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Old 09-09-11, 07:14 PM
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Pulpo,

Not a bad idea to give them a call. Certainly can't hurt....

XSleeper,

That was exactly one of my first ideas as to how to save some stain....and time!

tldoug,

Attempting to achieve 100% coverage on the first application is basically what I'm trying to do. The second coat, as I said, is a quickie spray over to fill in any cracks or anything that may not have gotten any or enough stain.
One concern about just doing one coat and backrolling and not trying to get 100% coverage is that as dry as I think this wood is will the stain really creep around and even out if it's going onto such a dry substrate?


Thanks!
 
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Old 09-09-11, 08:56 PM
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itsanss,

Let's say (just to make a point) that you thinned it 50% and were able to give it 2 full coats. Would that make more sense than NOT thinning it at all, and giving it 1 full coat at full strength? In that case, thinning it would simply be twice the work, for the same result. I think what you are suggesting is pretty much the same thing, just not that extreme.

IMO there is no way SW would recommend thinning their product to make it go farther. I think your goal should be to apply it at 300sf/gal as you initially planned.

One of the advantages of stain is that it usually doesn't peel. However, if you apply it too heavy it WILL peel just like paint. So keep in mind that solid color stain is not paint. IMO you should probably not be putting it on so heavy in the first place. Also, coats that have been sprayed on (like your final quick coat) and that are not backrolled are usually the ones that are most prone to peeling.
 
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Old 09-10-11, 04:54 AM
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That's my preferred way to stain a fence. I like to spray, backroll and then spray again. It takes more stain but you also wind up with a better looking, longer lasting job! As long as the 2nd spray coat is applied before the stain has dried - there shouldn't be any adhesion issues.

Generally 200 sq ft per gallon is about right. Rough sawn wood will drink more stain than slick wood. You also need to coat all the posts and other supports which adds sq footage. You've spent a lot so far on your fence and it really doesn't make sense to cheap out on the stain that will protect it. I'd recommend continuing as you have, if you have to wait a few weeks to come up with the money for the extra stain - the fence will wait on you
 
 

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