Water based over Oil based


  #1  
Old 09-25-11, 03:24 PM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Canada
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Water based over Oil based

I've just gone through a nightmare removing wallpaper from a tall stairwell going into a basement. There was some light blue paint under the wallpaper. I gave it a light sand and proceeded to the paint store.

They sold me Paint and Primer in one. So I just spent hours and hours painting everything but there is spots where the light blue still shows through slightly.

I then went back and they are telling me I probably painted over oil based paint and so I need to use primer and then paint. But the problem is I already just painted over all the old paint.

Can I just do a second coat of the paint and primer in one to accomplish the same goal? I can't imagine doing 2 more coats - what a nightmare this is.
 
  #2  
Old 09-25-11, 04:09 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,081
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
Welcome to the forums!

1st we need to determine if you painted over oil base enamel - http://www.doityourself.com/forum/pa...latex-oil.html
Obviously you'll need to find a spot that you haven't already painted over. Maybe under a switch plate cover or a wall you haven't painted. While a little more difficult, you could remove the new paint and test the underlying paint.

IMO paint/primer all in one is more a marketing ploy than fact. Generally a primer isn't needed to repaint a wall. Do you know if you removed all the wallpaper adhesive? Leftover adhesive is an issue that can be resolved by applying an oil base primer or zinnser's Gardz. If there is adhesive remaining on the wall it will show up as a bad texture.

To answer your question - another coat of your paint will solve the coverage problem however if you did apply latex over oil enamel there could be an adhesion issue that simply painting over it with paint or primer will not fix
 
  #3  
Old 09-25-11, 06:27 PM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Canada
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hello thanks for the response. I've covered every inch of the old paint so no samples to test from the old paint now - I did lightly sand and I'm pretty sure I got rid of any possible adhesive before I painted. There's just certain areas where the old paint shows through faintly. I guess I'm hoping just applying another coat will resolve this, but that apparently defeats the point of the primer/paint in one. I'm new to painting - and after what I've gone through so far I can pretty much say I have no excitement to start a new project any time soon.

As for possible adhesion issues - I rub my hand on the wall and it doesn't appear to be coming off - or is this not what you mean?
 
  #4  
Old 09-26-11, 04:52 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,081
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
Latex paint will often adhere to oil base enamel for awhile. What happens is later on when the wall gets nicked, those areas will start to peel. You've probably seen it in older houses where the cabinets or stained woodwork was repainted without using the proper primer.

'oops' or 'goof off' can be used to remove some of the new paint. If it also removes the underlying paint - it's latex and all you need to do is touch up or repaint the walls that didn't have full coverage. If it doesn't affect the underlying paint, I'd aggressively sand the wall and apply a sealer like Zinnser's Gardz or Peel Stop before adding more latex paint.
 
  #5  
Old 09-26-11, 05:19 AM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Canada
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks Mark - another question. I did run an orbital sander over the walls to roughen up the old paint. Do you think that might save me from having to sand everything down now? I did notice 2 small spots (about the size of a quarter) where the paint bubbled and peeled but everywhere else was fine.

I'll try the oops or goof off to see what it removes, then I guess I'm back to re sanding everything, applying primer and then paint?

A learning experience indeed, just not a very enjoyable one!
 
  #6  
Old 09-26-11, 05:32 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,081
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
Don't beat yourself up too much, the hard lessons are usually the ones that teach us the most

Generally aggressively sanding the paint will remove any paint that isn't well bonded to the wall. Since you sanded before applying the paint, that will help the paint you applied to adhere better.

When was your house built? For the most part, oil base enamel hasn't been used on interior walls since the late 60's to early 70's although some still used oil base enamel on kitchen and bath walls for another 10 yrs.
 
  #7  
Old 09-26-11, 05:38 AM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Canada
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I believe it was built in the 70s but I'm not sure the exact year.

Mark - the hardest part for me is this is in a stairway leading to a basement and the walls are very high up and difficult to access. I'm on a ladder half the time or reaching and straining with a roller on a long extension. To do this all over again wouldn't be as much of an issue if it wasn't so difficult to reach! There's a lot of areas that are high up and wouldn't be touched ever so I'm wondering if I should just apply a bit more paint and 'see what happens' rather than cause myself any more torment. I do want to do it correctly but I'm getting really tired of this project as I have a dozen other things that need to be done.

Maybe the sanding I did will help, I guess only time will tell.
 
  #8  
Old 09-26-11, 05:45 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,081
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
Ya, painting stairwells can be a lot of fun

You might be ok just applying another coat of paint - just can't guarantee it
The worst that can happen is you'll have to scrape off the failing paint and add joint compound or spackling to the edges of the peeled paint...... and we don't know that will happen
 
  #9  
Old 09-26-11, 07:17 AM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Canada
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I think I'll use up whatever paint I have left to make it look acceptable and just leave it for now, with the knowledge that it could fail. If when the weather shifts it starts to peel, I will know why and won't be scratching my head in confusion. Then it will be time to get out my sander and redo everything at that point. I just can't imagine doing it all over again right now, I'm beyond frustrated. I've learned quite a bit though, and really appreciate your help Mark.

Thanks!
 
  #10  
Old 09-26-11, 10:55 AM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,630
Received 98 Votes on 86 Posts
I haven't used one but primer and paint in one product doesn't make sense to me since they have different jobs.

That said, you may just need another coat of paint to truly cover what was underneath so doing that might be a good choice since it would be less work than sanding (and maybe priming) and painting. I hear you on the stairwell - I have a 12' dining room ceiling and then a half flight of stairs down to the basement, so at least 16' floor to ceiling there, I'm not interested in painting that wall any more than I have to.
 
  #11  
Old 09-28-11, 06:49 PM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Canada
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hey, I figured I'd update on how things ended up. I had barely enough paint left but I put a thin coat over and it looks acceptable. Not perfect but good enough that I won't lose any sleep over it. I did notice the areas I had to use a brush don't seem to match where I used the roller - but that's probably a technique problem. This was my first paint project ever so I'll excuse myself lol! I'll see how it goes from here, hopefully it lasts. I'm already looking at the lower wall below where I painted that's all marked up wondering if I should just repaint it now.. the fun never ends! Thanks again for the input, I appreciate it.
 
  #12  
Old 09-29-11, 04:23 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,081
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
Your more than welcome! The issue at the ceiling where the brush and roller meet could either be a coverage issue or a roller 'texture' issue. Ideally you cut it in and before the cut in [brush work] can dry, roll the wall bringing the roller as tight to the ceiling as you can without hitting the ceiling............ but that's in a perfect world
 
  #13  
Old 09-29-11, 06:41 AM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,630
Received 98 Votes on 86 Posts
Yeah, there's potential for technique to cause problems as well as the paint and the applicators.

I buy quality brushes, roller covers and paints so technique is the only problem when I paint
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: