What Type of Pain For Trim/For Walls/For Ceiling?

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Old 10-05-11, 08:33 PM
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What Type of Pain For Trim/For Walls/For Ceiling?

Hi, I have an old cape cod that I am repainting the interior of to bring it back to a more traditional/classic cape cod look. I am going with an antique white for the walls (like a Benjamin Moore Decorator's white or Behr).

What type of paint do you use (for the walls and what type of paint do you use for the trim? How about the ceiling?

Do you use the same paint for the doors as you use for the trim?

Thanks!
 
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Old 10-05-11, 11:44 PM
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I use a washable flat or an eggshell finish for the walls, a semi gloss for the trim & a flat for the ceiling but none of that is written in stone.
 
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Old 10-06-11, 05:07 AM
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Eggshell/satin latex enamel is my favorite for walls because it doesn't have a lot of sheen and is very washable. Many like flat wall paint because it will help to hide any defects in the wall's finish. Ceilings generally get painted with flat latex although the bath rm walls and ceiling should be painted with an enamel - it helps to protect the drywall/plaster from the moisture.

You always want to use an enamel of the wood trim. Generally it looks best if the sheen on the woodwork is higher than the sheen of the walls. But 1st you need to know what type of enamel is currently on the woodwork. If it's an oil base enamel you need to stick with oil base or coat the trim with a solvent based primer before switching to latex enamel.
http://www.doityourself.com/forum/pa...latex-oil.html
 
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Old 10-06-11, 07:37 AM
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I tend to like a little more sheen on my walls, I use a satin finish (though I use Benjamin Moore paint and they call it Pearl). Flat paint on the ceiling, though.

You are best off buying your paints and supplies at a paint store rather than a paint department in a bigger store. Also, keep in mind all manufacturers have multiple lines of paint and you're probably not going to be happy with the bottom of the line paint from any manufacturer.
 
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Old 10-06-11, 02:55 PM
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Thanks for the replies! It sounds like you all agree across the board that ceilings should be flat paint. You all very when it comes to trim and walls though...

I realize that bathrooms and the kitchen sink area might be special circumstances, but is there some classic designation as to what are usually used for trim and what is usually used for walls?

Also, can I test for latex vs. oil using rubbing alcohol? I don't have denatured alcohol.

Thanks!!
 
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Old 10-06-11, 03:33 PM
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I despise Pearl paint by Benjamin Moore. I had a big commercial job. The wife had picked Pearl. It looked like an iridescent suit from the 60s. The husband hated it. We went back to the paint store. I knew they were going to try to sell me different roller. Sure enough, when we arrived, they tried to sell me a different roller. Then I called the 800 number at Benjamin Moore. The guy told me, what you see is what you get with Pearl. Great answer. I refuse jobs when if Pearl is going to be used.
 
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Old 10-06-11, 03:34 PM
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In new construction and probably about half of the repaints - flat walls and ceilings is standard. Most codes [and common sense] require enamel on the bath rm walls and ceilings. Semi-gloss enamel is probably the most common paint on woodwork. Some [like me] prefer gloss and others will use satin. There really isn't an industry standard for sheen levels although most eggshell and satin finishes are similar. I've used some that was labeled low luster but it was still close to eggshell/satin. Some brands of gloss will have a higher sheen than others.

Not all latex enamels are the same. Wall enamel generally isn't tough enough to used on the woodwork. A trim enamel can be used on the woodwork or the walls. There is a big difference between cheap latex enamels and their pricier quality counterpart.

I don't know if rubbing alcohol will work you could try it on some known latex paint and see if it will dissolve it.
 
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Old 10-06-11, 07:24 PM
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As you can see from my and Pulpo's posts, you're not going to get agreement on all topics when it comes to painting
 
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Old 10-10-11, 10:07 AM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
the bath rm walls and ceiling should be painted with an enamel - it helps to protect the drywall/plaster from the moisture.

You always want to use an enamel of the wood trim. [/url]
What is enamel paint? Different then something like Behr Ultra latex eggshell or semigloss, etc?
 
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Old 10-10-11, 10:11 AM
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Wow... great information. Thanks you all so much. OK, I think I am going to use flat on ceilings, eggshell on walls, and semigloss for the trim. I am looking for the most classic combo. Sound about right? Plus, I do like the way these paint sheens look for each application.
 
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Old 10-10-11, 04:04 PM
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Eggshell, satin, semi-gloss and gloss paints are all enamels. Enamel paint comes in latex, oil base and waterborne. There is a difference between latex wall enamel and latex trim enamel. Latex trim enamel dries a little bit harder and is better suited for the extra wear the wood work receives. Oil base used to be the preferred trim enamel yrs ago. Today, I'm partial to the waterborne enamels as they preform almost as good as oil enamel and won't yellow over time like the oil does.

Your plan sounds fine
 
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Old 10-11-11, 05:39 AM
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I think you've chosen well. Flat paint can look good on walls and is the most forgiving of uneven surfaces but you're going to gain some washability with the eggshell (plus, I like a little sheen on the walls anyway )
 
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