What is the best way to Color Match an existing room color.


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Old 10-25-11, 10:05 AM
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What is the best way to Color Match an existing room color.

Hi all, hopefully someone can answer my question or give me some tips.

I recently took down my fixtures in all of my bathrooms after noticing that some of the towel racks and toilet paper roll holders were getting loose from the drywall and it was time for an upgrade.

After taking them down and doing some spackling, then sanded and proceeded to paint the rooms, only then did I notice that I only had some spare paint for only one of my bathrooms. The other two were a different shade. So I went out to get paint ships to color match, but I can find the proper shade I am looking for. The paint chip that came the closest came between two shade a little lighter than one chip and a little darker than the next chip. Can anyone give me some tips on how to color match. I really don't want to repaint two bathrooms, because I would have to remove two big mirrors and toilet tanks to do it right and I really don't have the time to do it.

Thanks,

Afrowookie
 
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Old 10-25-11, 10:41 AM
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Welcome to the forums.

Best bet would be to take some chips of the existing paint to a paint store to have them match it for you. That said, I don't have a lot of confidence you're going to get a close enough match to have a repair look good - personally, I would paint the whole wall.
 
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Old 10-25-11, 03:48 PM
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Even if you get a perfect color match - will the sheen be exact?
If you have a can of the right paint [empty or not], take it to the paint store so they can match it.

If you hired me to do the touch up, I'd go ahead and paint the whole wall. If the color is close you won't notice that it wasn't painted behind the commode..... in fact it wouldn't take much to go ahead and repaint the entire bath rm [assuming it's a normal size bath rm]
 
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Old 10-27-11, 04:01 AM
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color matching

When you want the exact same color and have no left-over paint or paint can, the best thing to do (asuming that you have drywall) is take a small break-off blade and cut a 1.5" x 1.5" square out of the SURFACE of the existing paint on the wall. To do this, find an inconspicuous spot and cut into the surface of the wall with a very sharp break-off blade knife (These knives can be purchased at any hardware store. You can buy a cheap "throw away" quality for a few bucks.) Go into the wallboard just deaply enough to provide that you will, then with the break-off blade, starting at one of the corners of this square, begin to peel off this little block of previously painted wallboard. Attempt to go deeply enough to get enough of the wallboard so that when you peel it, it doesn't tear in half. You want it to be about the same thickness as the paper swatch paint sample found in stores' paint departments. If it has been painted with latex in the past, it will be flexible enough to come off, slowly, in one piece and you'll have a sample that can be matched using a photo cell at a paint store. You'll be able to spackle over the "patch that you cut out, later. When you patch it, use successive, thin layers of spackle that will dry quickly rather than a "thick layer of spackle." The reason is that a thick layer will have enough moisture in it to swell the raw, paper in the wallboard and your surface won't get a smooth when you patch it.

The other thing, as mentioned in a previous post, is to determine the "luster of the paint you used, originally in the room. Is it "flat", "satin", "eggshell," or "semi-gloss"? The luster will effect the way that the new paint difuses light. You'll be able to get pretty close to the same shade if you have the same luster. It may not be exact but there is no other way to get a near-perfect match, today, than with a photo-cell custom match at a paint store or HD or Lowes.

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 10-27-11, 04:14 AM
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"The reason is that a thick layer will have enough moisture in it to swell the raw, paper in the wallboard"

Whenever you have exposed gypsum it's good practice to first coat that area with a solvent based primer or Zinnser's Gardz - that will prevent the moisture in the joint compound [or spackling] from causing an issue.
 
 

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