FIBEROCK® Aqua-Tough paint finish?


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Old 11-06-11, 07:16 AM
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FIBEROCK® Aqua-Tough paint finish?

CGC - FIBEROCK® Aqua-Tough

What is the best paint finish for FIBEROCK® Aqua-Tough? Please help by naming brand manufacture and type of paint. Any painting tips for this board would be appreciated too! Installation to be in a pick-up takeout restaurant, with FRP panels in the kitchen. (low grease)

Thank you
 
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Old 11-06-11, 10:50 AM
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The best paint finish depends on lot on the intended use. For a commercial setting the range could be from a waterborne or latex enamel to an epoxy finish. Great paint can be purchased from most paint stores. SWP and BM are probably the most well known. I'd suggest going to your local paint store [not a paint dept] and discuss your needs with them. They'll know which of their coatings will work best for your application.
 
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Old 11-06-11, 11:12 AM
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Thanks for the reply marksr, my issue is I live in a small city and there is not many who have used this product so though the paint store staff may be knowledgeable I doubt if they have came across this product. The fiberboard is basically smooth cement board with no paper backing in my usage I will be using drywall-mud for taping and screw cover. The fiberboard is not absorbent (waterproof) so best paints suggestions is desired and technique.
I always use a paint store (BM I believe) over a paint department and have found them mostly helpful and accurate, but there have been times where they missed the boat or did not understand my needs.
I guess for a paint finish a suggestion of what they use in schools would be my requirement. I will be using it in lobby area. hallways, storage areas and also prep areas. In the actual kitchen there will be FRP and around the pot sinks will be FRP.
 
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Old 11-06-11, 11:26 AM
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Priming should be fairly consistent with regular drywall. While I've never painted that particular substrate, I've painted professionally since the early 70's. Using the right primer for the intended top coat is the most important primer decision. An epoxy enamel would be the most durable but it's also the priciest and a little harder to work with [you have to add the catalyst, wait for it to work before it can be applied, touch ups are a hassle] No enamel touch's up well.

Industrial enamel would also wear well although the trend is to get away from solvent based or high VOC coatings. Waterborne enamels are very durable. Bare minimum would be a quality latex enamel.
 
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Old 11-07-11, 06:36 PM
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as expected!

Went to my local friendly Benjamin Moore dealer and queried about what would be best to cover the fiberock! After explaining what it was and a phone call for her to ask someone more knowledgeable LATEX was the answer!!

Super Spec HP® Waterborne Urethane Gloss Finish KP73

http://www.benjaminmoore.com/Downloa...eet_file_en_CA

I had to ask about this product, and yes she agreed it would probably be better for my needs, but special order only at the tune of $90.00 a gal; lucky I only need 18 gals

Any experience with this product anyone!
 
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Old 11-08-11, 04:13 AM
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I've not used that particular coating although I have used a lot of SWP's ProClassic waterborne enamel and believe it's the best enamel I've ever used for interior woodwork/walls.
Going by BM's specs, that enamel should be a step or two above the ProClassic. It appears to be a waterborne version of an industrial enamel..... sure is pricey though

What primer did they suggest? I would use a latex enamel undercoater.
 
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Old 11-08-11, 06:20 AM
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MoorePro® Interior Latex Primer Sealer K190

But I think with your recommendation this would be more suitable.

Super Spec® Latex Enamel Undercoater and Primer Sealer K253

http://www.benjaminmoore.com/Downloa...eet_file_en_CA

I will probably use this under your recommendation, but I did find specs from BM stating that a smooth non porous surface such as finished concrete would only need two coats of the paint without primer. (can't get much less porous then waterproof) I guess with primer I may only need one coat of paint, but I'm not looking forward to sanding that primer!!

Suggested tools, type of rollers brushes etc.. We do not have a SW dealer so we recommending please use BM as I like this dealer the best in our city.

Thank You
 
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Old 11-08-11, 09:22 AM
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I've worked mostly with SWP so I'm not real familiar with BM's coating and product line
The primer will be cheaper than that high price waterborne enamel Enamel undercoaters help the enamel to retain their sheen better.

Don't skimp on brushes or roller covers - it's easier to do a good job with the right tools. I'm old school and have never adjusted to the synthetic roller covers so I almost always use lambswool..... but that doesn't mean you can't do a good job with the less costly synthetic covers - just be sure it's a good one. I'd use a 1/2" nap for both the primer and finish. The primer shouldn't need much sanding if applied correctly. Basically a light scuff sand with a sanding pole should do fine. Some will prefer to use a 3/8" nap for the finish coat, I prefer the 1/2" because it holds more paint [means I get done quicker] The bigger nap does require a little more finesse to get a nice even finish.

I'd recommend using a Purdy brand brush, they are among the best although BM might have a store brand that is similar. The size and type depend a lot on your brushing skills although a 3" works best for most. Some do better with sash [angled] brushes. I only use them for specific jobs, I prefer a regular straight cut brush for most work. The main thing is to have brushes you are comfortable with using. Cleaning the brush daily and storing it in the shuck/wrapper it came with will allow the brush to last for many years.


My SOP for new construction is to spray the primer and cut and roll the finish coats. Generally the bldg/house will be empty when I spray the primer with other trades working while I apply the finish coats.
 
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Old 11-11-11, 04:22 PM
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Got answer from Benjamin Moore

Well I got a reply from BM, one I don't really like as I will be painting in an operating business/residential building..

"The FIBEROCK® Aqua-Tough is a waterproof drywall board…being water proof…not all water based product will perform well. For better result we suggest priming with our Alkyd Primer K024. For further detail on this product, please consult the attached Technical Data Sheet.

I would stay away from regular latex primer sealer."

So I will respond questioning for a lower VOC suggestion seeing what the draw backs may be!
 
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Old 11-11-11, 05:27 PM
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Not sure what your objection is but their comment about the substrate being waterproof and therefore requiring an oil based primer instead of a latex one makes sense to me.
 
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Old 11-11-11, 10:19 PM
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Simple, oil base stinks, and staff WILL complain of headaches and nausea; been there before. Now give me an oil base with low VOC (344 Grams/ Litre does not seem low) then I will use it gladly.

My last experience with oil base was for a workshop floor about 4 years ago, I could still smell the fuming two years later. Which was not a good thing considering it was a candy storage area.
 
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Old 11-12-11, 05:06 AM
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Solvent based primers/paints do have better adhesion properties than their latex counterpart. They also tend to seal better than latex. I'm not familiar with the FIBEROCK® Aqua-Tough I suggest contacting USG and see what type of primer they recommend. I've not used any but there might be some waterborne primers out there that would be suitable.
 
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Old 11-12-11, 08:58 AM
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BM replied to my request of a lower VOC paint and suggested the following:

Fresh Start All Purpose Interior/Exterior 100 Acrylic Primer (023)

Fresh Start 100% Acrylic Superior Primer 046

"I tend to go more with an oil base primer but I’m pretty confident a super adherent primer like our 023 or 046 would probably also perform well.

I would stay away from regular latex primer sealer like 253 or 562 as I expect adhesion failure.

Thanks,"

If it can work on these it must work on fibrerock: Formica®, Masonite®, ceramic tile and cured plaster, what you think?
 
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Old 11-12-11, 11:52 AM
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I would think either of those two primers would be fine although I'm not sure I buy the bit about those primers adhering well to formica or ceramic tile
 
 

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