Need Help Determining the Correct 3M Respirator Cartridge....

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Old 12-15-11, 06:03 AM
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Need Help Determining the Correct 3M Respirator Cartridge....

Hello all! I'm not sure if this is the best forum to ask this but since it has to do with paint, I figured I'd give it a shot.

I have a 3M 6000 series respirator that I need help choosing a filter for. Iím having a hard time decoding the NIOSH and OSHA jargon. What I want is:

1. Lead, Mold, dust (P100)
2. Disenfectants (Chlorine/Ammonia Based)
3. Paint Vapors

When I say paint vapors, I'm refering to the VOC's in store bought paint. Oil based primers, laquers, thinners, etc. The VOC's really screw me up. I also use brushed on auto body stuff like floor coatings, underlinings, bed liners, etc. Those are loaded with VOC's. Nothing you can't buy from your local auto parts store.

My research has found the following:

1. 3M P100 Multi-gas/Vapor Cartridges (pair) - GEMPLER'S
This one protects against particulates and Disenfectants, but not organic vapors like paint spray.

2. 3M P100 Filter Cartridges, Pesticide/Organic Vapor, One Pair - GEMPLER'S
This one protects against particulates and organic vapors like paint spray, but not ammonia or chlorine disenfectants.

Is the 1st one the one I need? Is the type of paint I deal with just organic vapors?

Any help would be greatly appreciated!
 
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Old 12-15-11, 06:12 AM
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For painting you'd need the 2nd one, that should include most any type of coating you would use. I'm not familiar with that particular respirator Does it have a prefilter? or is the cartridge all inclusive? The one I use takes the round cartridges and then has a cotton [?] prefilter.

Ideally you'd change out cartridges to fit the job at hand but I'd start with the 2nd one - it will probably handle all/most of your needs.
 
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Old 12-15-11, 06:32 AM
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Agreed. The only catch is that I could use an acid gas type cartridge too. I have a mold remediation project on hand and will be spraying tons of bleach and on another project some ammonia based chemicals. It seems the second one isn't ideal for that.

I should probably just buy one of each. And yes, these are the cartridge types that are all inclusive. I'm currently using the round P100 "soft" filter for general messes that might contain lead.
 
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Old 12-19-11, 05:07 AM
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I figured I'd post the conclusion of this adventure just in case someone stumbles on it some day. I bought the 3M 60926. After talking with the guys at the safety supply warehouse, it was the appropriate one. It hands Acid Gas (Chlorine Bleach), Ammonia based chemicals, P100 particulates (lead, mold, asbestos), and Organic Vapors.

The organic vapors include petroleum based chemicals found in stains, primers, etc. Basically if the paints are smelly and make your head swim its an organic vapor.

This filter doesn't handle paint spray. Not that it wont filter it, the spray will just clog up the filter. I use rollers or brushes so its no biggy.

I went up into th attic and sprayed the sheathing with 60/40 bleah/water. It did a great job at killing the mold. One thing I would do differently is USE GOGGLES!!! My eyes were burning because the attic was filled with chlorine vapor!
 
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Old 12-19-11, 05:16 AM
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This filter doesn't handle paint spray. Not that it wont filter it, the spray will just clog up the filter.
I think that's why most painters use a respirator like mine. It has a prefilter that gets changed out often [and they are fairly cheap] and the cartridge lasts a long time, presumably because the prefilters take the brunt of the overspray........ but as long as you don't spray paint, that's a mute point.

I'm am a little concerned about your strong bleach mixture. Bleach will destroy wood fibers This usually isn't a problem when you rinse the bleach off shortly after application. On the outside, I never use a bleach/water solution stronger than 50/50. I think the standard strength for interior use where it isn't feasible to rinse it off is 10% bleach.
 
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