Primer to Seal Cinder Block Chimney

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Old 01-19-12, 10:16 AM
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Primer to Seal Cinder Block Chimney

I have an interior cinder block chimney (runs up through the middle of the house) that has a sort of resin that was seeping through the cracks and pores in the block and throught the paint and/or bubbling up the paint on the surface. This was from the exhaust of the gas furnace and water heater in the basement because there was no chimney liner. I have stopped the source by getting a new furnace with a proper chimney liner. Now, I want to scrape this crud off and seal it as a preparation for applying a textured surface with drywall mud. I already did the drywall mud texturing in the other half of the duplex and it worked well, but I think I need to seal this the best I can so the remnants don't leach out.

I've considered Killz, Zinserr BIN, or maybe even DryLok, which is normally used as a masonry waterproofer. From what I have read, the resin is likely a toxic mix with nitric acid and other fun stuff. Any suggestions?
 
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Old 01-19-12, 03:28 PM
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You'll need to use a solvent based sealer, I don't believe latex would adequately seal it.
I'd be a little leery of applying j/c to the block. If the block was to absorb any moisture it would play havoc on the j/c.
 
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Old 01-19-12, 03:40 PM
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Like Zinserr shellac based?
 
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Old 01-19-12, 03:47 PM
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Yes, BIN is the ultimate stain sealer. Oil base Kilz might be ok but it's a little hard to say from here
 
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Old 01-19-12, 04:25 PM
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Could wood have ever been burned using that chimney? Creosote can be a real problem when it combines with moisture and saturates concrete products.
It can be driven out later by heat.

Dick
 
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Old 01-19-12, 05:25 PM
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Most likely there was a wood burning stove on the main floor a long time ago (there's a hole where an exhaust pipe probably once was). House was built in `48 so it probably used to have an oil furnace in the basement. I've been here 11 years and there was always a little of the leaching resin, but then it got worse a few years ago - I believe because I got a programmable thermostat and started turning the heat down to 55 F during the day leading to more condensation.
 
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Old 01-20-12, 05:56 AM
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Creosote hadn't even entered my mind I'd recommend using BIN.
 
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