painting vinly/plastic shutters

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Old 05-11-12, 06:31 PM
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painting vinly/plastic shutters

I installed vinly/plastic shutters around ten years ago and they could use brighting up....in the past i have used krylon plastic spray paint on plastic items...is this my best option?......the can states that no prep work is needed....is this true.....what is my best option to paint the shutters...thanks
 
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Old 05-11-12, 07:08 PM
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The krylon plastic paint does hold up well in my experience, though I don't know about it if exposed to sunlight and weather......but the shutters need to be cleaned well using something like a green scrubbie....allowed to dry ...then wiped down with alcohol or mineral spirits (I've always used alcohol).

You could probably use a good quality exterior latex and get the same results.
 
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Old 05-12-12, 05:21 AM
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I've always used latex house paint. The shutters need to be clean no matter what paint is used.
 
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Old 05-12-12, 07:48 AM
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I've got about 8 to do for a client (add on to a deck we are redoing) and will take your advice on cleaning first, then latex paint.......now.....she has picked one color for the shutters and the wrought iron handrails in front of the house. I know I have to needle scale the little rusty areas down (not many) and prime it with a good metal primer. BUT, can I use the same latex paint on the handrails as I do for the plastic shutters??
 
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Old 05-12-12, 12:51 PM
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If the primer coat is heavy enough, you could use the latex on the wrought iron but I wouldn't. Once the latex paint starts to fail or the rust beneath becomes active - the latex doesn't have any rust inhibition properties. I'd get a quart of the same color in an exterior oil enamel, it won't cost that much more and won't come back to haunt you.
 
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Old 05-12-12, 03:35 PM
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Thanks, Mark, that's why I don't paint. I'll have them mix up a quart of enamel to do the short handrails up.
 
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Old 05-13-12, 05:42 AM
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there is a reason companies make primers.

On the plastic shutters, I have had customers use a latex house paint on them and about a year latter they could take it all off in one big sheet. You should really prime it first. Clean it, wipe it with Xylene, then use XIM's Plastic and Vinyl Bonding Primer. Then paint it. Of course that is assuming you want it to stick.

On the metal, oil based paints do not inherently prevent rust. especially now. You should really spot prime with and oil based rust inhibitive primer. Then topcoat with a latex. An oil enamel with fad a chalk with exposure to UV.
 
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Old 05-13-12, 01:50 PM
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I've never had any issues using latex house paint over vinyl shutters. It is imperative to get them clean and if there is any chalkiness - add Flood's EmulsaBond to the paint.

It's true that exterior latex paints tend to fade less than their oil base counterpart but applying latex on wrought iron goes against everything I've learned/known about painting over the last 40 yrs or so. The primer can protect the latex from bare iron but sooner or later it will fail...... but then I am an old school painter
 
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Old 05-13-12, 03:31 PM
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last summer was a good one. over 100 "paintable" vinyl shutters. Washed, scrubbed and lightly sanded. Painted in a shop. 100% acrylic house paint applied. 1 month later the sprinklers were turned on. all shutters failed. We then used the primer and painted one of the failed shutters. We tested with a power washer. After 1 week we had no failure. the other shutter test with just the house paint (again) failed (again).

lesson: Prime
 
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Old 05-13-12, 05:36 PM
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When I sold shutters (and doors, windows, trim, etc)...we had a class by one of the major manufacturers. They said they sold 2 types of shutters...vinyl and plastic. The plastic was a sorta plain grey...of course the vinyl came in many colors. The plastic could be directly painted with latex after a solvent wipe...since thats what is was designed for. The vinyl needed to be roughed up a bit then primed and painted...but they said that was unofficial advice.

Many times I had people buy the vinyl (more sizes and styles than the paint ready) and say they would just paint them to the color they wanted. Numerous times I had return customers complaining of paint adhesion. I also had people complain about the grey plastic ones cracking after a year or so...well duh..yer supposed to paint them...they have no UV protection otherwise.

My bad for not saying that earlier...but it was pretty early.
 
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Old 05-27-12, 06:52 PM
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thanks took shutters dowm washed them with dish soap and a scrub brush then again with a power washer to prep for painting...when i came back after they dried they looked brand new..can i apply a wax or other protective substance before i rehang shutters?...Thanks
 
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Old 05-28-12, 05:29 AM
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Good question! Seems like I heard of a product to spray on vinyl siding that was supposed to rejuvenate it - maybe something like that would work.
 
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Old 05-28-12, 06:51 AM
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You might try a spray on wax like Eagle 1 Nanowax. It works well on plastic trim and such and won't leave a haze.
 
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Old 10-11-13, 11:34 AM
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Time for an UPDATE

These posts are pretty old, so does anyone have experience and longevity with new products? I've used Fusion on outdoor vinyl furniture and it has not peeled and remains looking good, but I'm not happy with the limited color choices for use on shutters. I've read advertising for Envirolon too, which is supposed to renew vinyl siding and shutters and contains chemicals with anti-UV properties, which is really the culprit on fading vinyl. But these chemical products are very high priced. If I had to take down the shutters it seems to me that it would be less work to just replace them rather than clean thoroughly, prime paint and re-install. So I'd prefer to use a product that renews the shutters on the house after I carefully wipe them down. Seems to me only the face of the shutter would need to be treated to provide a new/renewed look. Even with a pretty good UV protecting product it appears that the fix is only good for a few years (I get a lot of sun on most shutters). Oh, I also read about people that used vinyl pro9ducts meant to be sprayed on car tires - but they never report how long it lasts, i.e., as soon as it rains I would guess it washes off just as on tires - right onto your house siding and making a stain/mess? So, what's new and good for 2013?
 
 

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