Priming interior wood doors -- primer not covering wood


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Old 05-21-12, 12:11 PM
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Priming interior wood doors -- primer not covering wood

I purchased interior pre-hung wood doors (primed white) for my home, but the jambs were not primed. I started priming them with zinsser prime coat 2 (latex) but it was still showing the wood after one coat. The jamb is fir wood. In comparison the doors are completely white -- no grain showing. At this rate I'd have to put 2 coats or more to get it solid white. I'm pretty sure I stirred it enough so either I got a bad can or this is not good paint. To make matters worse it raised the grain so now I need to sand, which will remove some of the paint. I'd appreciate it if anyone can recommend a good paint to complete this job: latex or oil. I'm looking for the best paint that will do the job in one coat and result in a nice finish. A paint that can be sanded is preferred in case of drips/touch up needed. Not sure if it matters but I was using foam brushes since I've had bad experiences with dropping bristles before.
 
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Old 05-21-12, 12:16 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

Primer is not designed to cover the surface beneath, is it to seal it and provide a good bond with the paint. I would use an oil based primer on bare wood; I lean toward the Zinnser brand of primers.

What color do you intend to paint the doors? Oil based would work but can yellow with time so it's not a good choice for white. Latex paints these days are pretty good and would be fine as well. Best results will probably be seen with a waterborne enamel.

The best painting supplies and advice tend to be found in paint stores, not paint departments. This includes brushes, as good brushes will not drop bristles like cheap ones.
 
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Old 05-21-12, 12:39 PM
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They'll be white so I'll go with your suggestion and stick with latex.

I found a Zinsser Bullseye 123: sealer, interior/exterior, stain blocker, all surfaces, mold/mildew etc. Would this be a better option than the primecoat2? The primecoat indicates 2 coats are needed for best results, but this doesn't, which would save lots of labor.

btw, The paintbrushes I used before were expensive -- Purdy white china bristle. They dropped quite a few bristles on my polyurethane finish, which I could not remove w/o sanding through the poly.
 
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Old 05-21-12, 01:01 PM
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Is the bullseye oil based? IIRC, they have both a latex and oil based version of that product - I'd go with it if it was oil based.
 
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Old 05-21-12, 03:54 PM
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Use either a latex or oil base enamel undercoater. Expect to sand lightly after the primer dries and again after the first coat of enamel. Personally I don't like foam brushes. Purdy is a good brand of brushes! All natural bristle brushes will shed a little when new, I like to knead them with my fingers before the first use - that helps to remove any loose bristles. Natural bristle [including china bristle] is only for solvent based coatings [water will ruin them] For latex you need a nylon, polyester or nylon/poly blend brush.

The masonite doors are preprimed but the edges will need sanding and possibly another coat of primer. Don't forget to putty all the nail holes and caulk the joints for a professional looking job.
 
 

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