Puckering Paint on Bathroom Wall


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Old 06-02-12, 05:59 PM
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Puckering Paint on Bathroom Wall

We finished painting our bathroom approximately six months ago (during the winter months). The paint started to pucker once the weather started to become warmer. What can I do to fix it and prevent it from happening again? Is it necessarily correlated to the warmer weather?
 
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Old 06-03-12, 04:31 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

How old is your house? Do you have/use an exhaust fan during and after showers?

Those spots are caused by moisture but shouldn't have a lot to do with the time of year.
 
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Old 06-03-12, 05:33 AM
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Our house was built in the 1970s. We do have an exhaust fan that we probably don't use as much as we should. That being said, we have a second bathroom that we recently painted and we don't have the puckering problem in that bathroom.
 
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Old 06-03-12, 05:40 AM
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Do you know what type of paint was originally used in the bath rm? Many kitchen and baths from that time period were still painted with oil base enamel although some used latex enamel. Latex paint doesn't adhere well to oil base enamel..... so it's possible that's an issue.

I'd scrape off the offending areas, maybe test the paint under the scraping http://www.doityourself.com/forum/pa...latex-oil.html, then fill the depression with joint compound, let it dry and then texture the repairs with j/c thinned down to thick paint consistency - dab it on with a sponge. Then you'd just need to prime the repairs and touch up or repaint the ceiling.
 
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Old 06-11-12, 05:40 PM
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You can use exterior latex for bathrooms. They are designed for higher moisture conditions.
 
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Old 06-12-12, 04:23 AM
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There are 2 problems with using exterior paint on the interior. Exterior paint is formulated for the exterior and as such is allowed to have off gassing that's not allowed with interior paint. The other thing is because it's formulated for weather exposure the dried film isn't as hard as the dried film of interior paints - that means it won't wear as well
 
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Old 06-12-12, 07:10 AM
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Interior paint is meant for interior applications and exterior paint for exterior applications.

I'd start with Mark's suggestions and then stick with a quality interior paint for the room.
 
 

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