Marlite Painting in Bathroom


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Old 06-12-12, 07:47 AM
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Marlite Painting in Bathroom

Hello,
I have read a whole string of posts, most go way back, about folks trying to paint Marlite. But I've never seen an end result posted.

I'd like to know how it all turned out if somebody sees this who has tried painting Marlite.

My area to do are bathroom walls and what I've learned so far is to 'scuff it up', then prime and paint. I just want to know if this really works and holds up.

Thanks for any comments or suggestions.
 
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Old 06-12-12, 07:56 AM
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Welcome to the forums

No experience with this product but from what I read this makes sense. These directions seem pretty straight forward to me:
How to Paint Marlite Walls | eHow.com

Basically, it's get it clean, scuff the surface for better adhesion and then use the right primer and paint and you should be good to go.
 
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Old 06-12-12, 08:07 AM
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Thank you.

I have Kilz Premium exterior/interior primer/sealer/stain blocker but it is water base. Do you suppose that would work?

I have read the E-How information and that article does not specify any special type of primer.

Thanks for the quick reply.
 
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Old 06-12-12, 08:17 AM
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I am not a fan of the water based Kilz, I never use it.

Personally, I like the Zinnser line of primers. On something plastic-like, I would use an oil based primer.
 
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Old 06-12-12, 08:40 AM
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Ok, probably good advice, thanks.
 
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Old 06-12-12, 02:34 PM
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There are a few latex primers that claim to adhere well to finishes like Marlite but I don't trust them. I'm not sure if I've ever painted marlite but I have painted similar finishes - I always used either pigmented shellac [like zinnser's BIN] or an interior oil base primer. I would not use latex kilz!
 
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Old 06-12-12, 08:09 PM
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Thanks, I will stick with an oil base for this - I don't need the paint sort of sliding off with the humidity, etc. in a bathroom.
 

Last edited by Smokyie; 06-12-12 at 09:11 PM.
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Old 06-21-12, 08:16 AM
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I put some Zinsser oil primer on a scrap piece of Marlite. I "scuffed up" part of it and left the other section alone.

Now, that is is dry I cannot make a mark in either section, I ran it under hot water and I still can't scratch up either area. I'd have to use something like a scraper to mark it up now.

So, would it still be necessary to scuff up all the walls before I prime and paint?

Thank you.
 
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Old 06-21-12, 08:22 AM
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Maybe not but it's less work to scuff sand now than to repair this down the road. So, yes, I would still scuff sand everything first - keep in mind, this is a very quick sanding, it should not take more than a few minutes total, as you're only trying to rough up the surface a little bit, not remove any substantial amount of material.
 
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Old 06-21-12, 08:46 AM
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Thank you, I'll do the scuffing first.
 
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Old 06-21-12, 12:57 PM
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I like to scuff sand walls using a drywall sanding pole - that makes it quick and easy
 
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Old 06-28-12, 10:56 AM
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Ok, I have scuffed and tried to get all the corners and in between decorative strips. Then I cleaned the walls a second time.

The scuffing made quite a mess but I didn't take it down too deep.

There is still some shine on the walls, is it ok to prime now or should I maybe scuff it up with a lighter paper?

Thank you for your great tips.
 
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Old 06-28-12, 11:01 AM
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If you have sanding marks in every square centimeter, quit and start painting
 
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Old 06-28-12, 01:46 PM
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You shouldn't need to do a perfect job of sanding. As long as you got the majority of it scuffed up - the oil primer and latex paint ought to adhere fine. The sheen doesn't need to be sanded off, just roughed up enough to give the primer a better chance to adhere well.
 
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Old 07-05-12, 06:53 PM
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I have oil primer on the walls now and it looks like I will need three coats to cover well. So what would be best - two primer and one paint or one primer and two coats of paint?

Also, should the decorative strips between the marlite sheets be caulked in the shower area?

Thanks very much.
 
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Old 07-06-12, 04:51 AM
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If the entire wall has been coated with primer there is no need for a 2nd coat. 2 coats of finish will likely cover better and wear longer

Are you painting the tub/shower surround? if so we need to discuss your top coat options!
 
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Old 07-06-12, 05:53 AM
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Yes, one coat of primer is sufficient, put on two coats of paint.

And I agree with Mark's thought - you're painting in the shower? Or just near it? That's different than what we thought you were doing.
 
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Old 07-06-12, 08:05 AM
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Yes, I am painting in the shower area
 
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Old 07-06-12, 08:31 AM
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So literally you are painting walls which will have water hitting them?
 
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Old 07-06-12, 09:00 AM
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That would be correct. The marlite held up fairly well all these years. What's my next step?

Thanks again.
 
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Old 07-06-12, 09:06 AM
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You'll need caulk everything well! SWP used to have a shower stall paint but I couldn't find any info about it on their website - but it's been 20 yrs since I've used it. I suspect you'll need an epoxy of some type in order for the paint to last.
 
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Old 07-06-12, 09:12 AM
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Thanks for the fast reply and for trying to find the information for me. I'll have to get something else for that area.
 
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Old 07-06-12, 09:20 AM
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When you go to the paint store be sure to let the paint rep know what primer you've applied. Some epoxys require a certain type of primer. If need be you can reprime with the correct primer. It all depends on what you wind up using for a topcoat.
 
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Old 07-06-12, 01:44 PM
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Ok, I have been trying to search this out. Would 'marine' paint for boats be what I need here? The primer I have on the walls now is Zinsser oil base called "Cover Stain".

I should add that this is a second bathroom so the shower is only used about once a week at the most. It is not a shower stall but a tub with a shower.

I just want to get this job done and I'm getting more confused the more I look at different paint types.

Thanks
 
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Old 07-06-12, 01:56 PM
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Head to a local paint store and ask their advice - I'm sure the marine paint is not what you want but I don't know what would be the best choice in this situation.

The Zinsser primer may be ok but, as Mark mentioned, the right paint for this job may specify a certain primer be used underneath.
 
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Old 07-06-12, 04:29 PM
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Ok, thank you for the replies, again.
 
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Old 07-07-12, 04:38 AM
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A marine paint might be ok but talking to a paint rep is really what you need to do. They'll know what coatings they sell and can help you make an informed decision on which coating will work best for you.
 
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Old 07-07-12, 11:33 AM
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Thank you, I'll try to talk to somebody next week.
 
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Old 07-09-12, 07:50 AM
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Sherwin Williams is recommending "Duration Home" paint for this or epoxy but that comes in gallons. I only need to cover about 50 sq ft.

I've never heard of Duration Home, but it is available in a quart. Does this seem appropriate for my job?

Thank you.
 
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Old 07-09-12, 08:07 AM
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Personally, I always buy a gallon even if I don't need that much - it's been my experience that the paint in quart cans does not always have quite the same color as the paint in gallon cans. Doesn't make sense but I've had it happen....

Hang tight - Mark knows SWP really well, I'm sure he'll be able to answer your question.
 
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Old 07-09-12, 08:11 AM
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And it seems like normally you pay about 1/2 the gallon price for just a quart.
 
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Old 07-09-12, 08:26 AM
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Yep, they get you there. At this point I don't even care about color!

The top of the walls is already painted to match the rest of the room and I only need the area over the tub where water might hit painted. It's all behind a curtain anyway.

For just an occasionally used shower this sure is causing me a lot of grief!
 
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Old 07-09-12, 09:14 AM
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Quarts can't always be mixed to match the gallon formula. If the formula can be divided by 4, it will match but if it's an amount that can't be measured out - they'll either have to leave out that tint or add too much.

I'd trust the epoxy more than I would the latex enamel. The Duration Home enamel [I've not used it] may do ok. If you go that route, I'd recommend inspecting the shower walls every so often for any signs of paint failure. It's an easier fix if you catch it soon - not so easy if damage is already present.
 
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Old 07-09-12, 09:30 AM
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I already have a quart of Exterior latex semi-gloss - Glidden paint+primer - would I be asking for trouble if I tried that?
 
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Old 07-09-12, 09:32 AM
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Don't use an exterior paint inside, not meant for that - chemical compositions allowed in exterior paint can exceed those which are allowed for interior paint.
 
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Old 07-09-12, 09:38 AM
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Exterior paints don't dry to as hard a film as interior paints do. It might preform as well as the duration interior enamel. Personally I'd have my doubts about using either and wouldn't if it was a customer's bath rm.

What Mitch is referring to is the off gassing of the exterior paint exceeds the amount that is allowed for interior use. It's all a matter of air quality!
 
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Old 07-09-12, 09:42 AM
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Yes, thank you, Mark - that's what I was looking for but said very poorly....
 
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Old 07-09-12, 09:50 AM
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Ok, I also have Behr Interior Semi-Gloss Enamel (paint/primer in one) - might that do?

Sorry to be such a bother with this!
 
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Old 07-09-12, 10:01 AM
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Personally, I have heard too many painting horror stories involving Behr paint that I won't use it so I can't advise on that choice. That said, Mark is our painting guru and his initial thought was an epoxy paint and the SWP store recommended that as well so it would be my choice. My philosophy is the cost of the paint is insignificant, I pay for the right product for the job.
 
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Old 07-09-12, 10:36 AM
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My concern is any latex enamel won't be durable enough for trouble free use on shower walls. If the walls are dried off after each shower, latex enamel might do ok but for a trouble free coating you'll need to step up to something like an epoxy.

That said, cement board and tile isn't all the expensive to diy and no worry about it failing.
 
 

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