sanding paper for acrylic paint


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Old 07-05-12, 08:27 PM
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sanding paper for acrylic paint

Is there a good, non-clogging (or slow-clogging) sandpaper for sanding acrylic paint? Thanks.
 
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Old 07-06-12, 04:41 AM
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Not really Latex paint 'melts' as it's sanding thus the clogging. There are different types of sandpaper - red garnet is my favorite with aluminum oxide my second.

What are you sanding?
 
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Old 07-06-12, 05:44 AM
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"Not really." Yeah, that's been my experience too, but I was hoping for some new, hightech sandpaper I guess. I'm sanding some boogery, ropey, badly painted door jambs and casings. And check this out...in the house I'm fixing up a previous owner noticed a door was binding so he put on his handy hat and planed THE JAMB. Actually, looks like he went at it with a chisel more than a plane... (insert sad face here.)
 
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Old 07-06-12, 06:06 AM
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Sometimes it's best to take a razor and 'shave' off the offending paint - then sand. When all else fails you can skim the door with joint compound and then sand it smooth, prime and paint.

he put on his handy hat and planed THE JAMB
Some folks just shouldn't be allowed anywhere near tools
 
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Old 07-06-12, 07:40 AM
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I wonder if a cabinet or card scraper might not be a better choice than sandpaper?
 
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Old 07-06-12, 08:40 AM
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That's a good idea and I'll give it a try. Again, a question of paint hardness though. And as with the other good suggestion, I can sand and scrape and prime with something sandable and then sand again, but it might be cost effective to rip out all and replace. Sheesh. It's really a matter of taste I guess: I can stand lumpy, pitted walls but doors and trim I want smooth.
 
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Old 07-06-12, 09:14 AM
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I can stand lumpy, pitted walls
Not me, other than texture the walls should be prepped and painted just as well as the woodwork. One of the most memorable compliments I ever got was from a blind man when I painted his house. There were random areas that were rough, I fixed them as I repainted the inside of his house. He noticed as he felt his way thru the house - he used to use the bad spots in the paint to get his bearings

Vic, a scraper would be another good method. Runs and drips in latex paint are too hard to sand out - scraping or cutting them off is the best way to go.
 
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Old 07-06-12, 10:02 AM
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As long as this is painted and not stained, I'd be willing to be aggressive and scrape instead of sand - you can always fill a gouge when you're painting.
 
 

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