Best Way To Use Paint Stripper: Need Advice

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Old 08-23-12, 12:34 PM
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Best Way To Use Paint Stripper: Need Advice

Greetings,

I've got an older house with nice wood interior door jams and window trim.

My goal is to take them down to the bare wood and clear coat them.

With the heat gun I've removed most of the old paint but I need to use a liquid paint stripper to get the wood where I want it: paint free.

This isn't my first rodeo with paint stripper but I always feel like i loose control to the chemical and end up feeling frustrated.

The simple truth is it's going to be a messy job, especially the over-head stuff. I can accept that part.

Before I get started I thought I'd post here to ask if anyone has advanced, expert paint stripping techniques or hints that could make this job easier.
 
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Old 08-23-12, 12:38 PM
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I use the nasty MEK-containing strippers and you have to use them outside. The citrus-based products would be the best bet if you're leaving the wood in place.

I'd also put a lot of plastic on the ground underneath if you're doing this inside.

Beyond that, I just slap it on, wait the prescribed amount of time and then scrape everything off.
 
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Old 08-23-12, 12:55 PM
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Use a gel type, especially for overhead. Apply liberally and then be more patient the than you thought you could be (let the stuff do it job). Remove the residual with a plastic scraper and then use appropriate steel wool fineness to get off the rest of the goop.

I usually follow with mineral spirits, wipe off and wash with a water/detergent and allow to dry. This gets you close to natural wood, but if you have ornate molding it may take some selected scraping and poking.

I am not nearly a expert, but have had a few old homes and learned by experience, so I am sure there other approaches by people with more experience.

Dick
 
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Old 08-23-12, 03:49 PM
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How old is the house? any danger of lead based paint?

The main thing with paint strippers is to follow the directions, you can't rush it and some [maybe all] areas will need a 2nd application. Getting the wood ready for varnish/poly can be an ambitious undertaking. Be prepared to do a good bit of sanding once you're done with stripper.
 
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Old 08-24-12, 10:05 AM
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house was built in the late 30's so the chance of lead is reasonable.

I'm going to take my time and allow the chemical to do its job. I'm also going to put plastic sheeting down to reduce the mess.

Once finished I'll sand everything down to remove the pesky bits. Feel confidant it'll come out nice
 
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Old 08-24-12, 10:25 AM
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A few years ago the gov't instituted a bunch of new regs concerning lead paint removal. I know homeowners have a little more leeway than contractors but since I retired before the new regs came out - I didn't have to take the class and learn more about it.

The 2 biggest dangers when dealing with lead paint is ingestion of paint chips [really only concerns children and it's fairly easy to contain the debris] and inhalation of lead dust from sanding. The stripper will remove most of the lead paint but I don't know if [or how much] the sanding after the stripping is cause for alarm.
 
 

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