How much Boiled Linseed Oil into Oil Based Paint?

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Old 09-06-12, 07:12 PM
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How much Boiled Linseed Oil into Oil Based Paint?

I have always heard that adding boiled linseed oil to your oil-based paint will increase the drying time and give it an even glossier finish, but I have never heard how much one should add.

Just started a new project refinishing an old rocking chair, and I'm going for a black ultra high gloss finish. I'm gonna use Rustoleum's gloss black oil based paint and was wondering if anyone knows how much boiled linseed oil I should add to give an even glossier finish. I appreciate the help.

Thanks,
Michael
 
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Old 09-07-12, 06:15 AM
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Welcome to the forums Michael!

About the only time I've ever added linseed oil to another coating has been the primer on siding that has been neglected for many yrs. I think we added about 10%. When linseed oil is the finish - it's cut in half with mineral spirits. Boiled linseed oil will slow down the drying process some, not speed it up. I've never heard of linseed oil making the finish glossier but it might. Linseed oil is more prone to mildew than oil base paint - if that's an issue in your locale.
 
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Old 09-07-12, 08:10 AM
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If this was a good idea, I would think the paint companies would be adding it themselves. These days, oil based paint is not often used anyway, they have declined in quality due to environmental laws while the latex paints have improved significantly in quality - I do not use oil based paints any longer.
 
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Old 09-07-12, 09:54 AM
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Mitch, years ago linseed oil was one of the ingredients of many oil base paints. I don't know if any paints still use it. I know in the S.E. mildew issues was one of the reasons it's use was discontinued. I don't know that the quality of oil base coatings has declined all that much but latex paints have improved significantly!

.... and that concludes today's lesson
 
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Old 09-07-12, 10:04 AM
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Old 09-07-12, 10:14 AM
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Interesting read although I don't agree with everything they said but that is the thing about painting, it isn't always cut and dried, sometimes there are multiple correct choices for a given job.
 
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Old 09-09-12, 01:27 AM
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Thanks for all the insight everyone, I decided to nix the boiled linseed oil. Didn't know that it was prone to mildew, thanks for that tid-bit. But the gloss oil based I used came out perfect without the linseed oil, just the right amount of gloss, and my rocking chair is looking classy!
 
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Old 09-09-12, 01:43 AM
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Oh yeah, mitch17, I liked that article a lot. I'm the head of the paint department at a hardware store out here in Los Angeles, and the regulations on paints are unreal! They take things off the shelves every other month as the laws get stricter and stricter. But the Hybrid Alkyd we have out here is excellent, works just as well as oil with the water cleanup, but it's pretty pricey.
 
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