How Do I Paint this Stucco and Brick Living Room?


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Old 12-04-12, 11:37 PM
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How Do I Paint this Stucco and Brick Living Room?

Hi:


I want to update my living room. The room has a stucco-like treatment on the walls and ceilings. One wall is made of a veneer brick.


I do not have the time or the money to remove and replace the drywall and the remove the brick wall and replace with new drywall. The paint color was chosen in order to complement the colors in the brick wall.


One photo shows what the stucco-like treatment looks like, another photo shows the color difference between the ceiling and the wall. And another photo shows the brick wall.


One wall has a sliding glass door, windows, and neutral beige drapes. There is wood flooring.


My question is- is there a treatment I can apply to the walls, both the stucco-like walls/ceilings and the brick wall, so that I can change the paint color in the room entirely? Can I do a slight sanding to the stucco, to leave the walls with some texture, but not as much as is there currently? Can I paint over the bricks and would it look nice?


What color would you suggest for this room. The room adjacent to this one is the dining room, and it will be painted in a neutral robin's egg blue-green (blue arrow 5001-3c by Valspar).


Your thoughts and ideas are appreciated.
 
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Old 12-05-12, 04:19 AM
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I don't paint. What you have is 1970's stippled walls. They will actually cut you if you brush up against them . I had them in an apartment once. About all you can do is sand down the high points on the stippling, leaving a semi knock down surface and paint it. As far as the brick wall, what I have seen is a complete paint covering including the grout lines to a lighter color. Helps blend in the walls better, but you lose the ambiance of the original bricks, if that matters.
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Old 12-05-12, 06:12 AM
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is there a treatment I can apply to the walls, both the stucco-like walls/ceilings and the brick wall, so that I can change the paint color in the room entirely?
I don't understand

The walls [including brick] can be painted as is or you can scrape or sand some of the texture down, even skim coat the drywall for a slick finish if desired. Since you'd be either exposing some raw joint compound or skimming the walls with j/c they should be primed before applying the finish coat.

I've painted a lot of brick over the years. It works best to have a 1" or larger nap roller, slop the paint on so it runs into all the mortar joints and then 'wipe' the runs out once the roller cover gets fairly dry. Normally takes 2 coats. Just remember, once you paint the brick there is no going back.
 
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Old 12-05-12, 06:47 AM
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Hi:

Thank you for the tips and advice. I appreciate it. If I left the brick alone, but did the kind of resurfacing you talk about on the walls and ceiling, what do you think would be a good paint color for the walls and ceiling, considering that the original brick will still be there?
 
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Old 12-05-12, 12:06 PM
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There is a wide range of colors that will go with that brick. Don't be afraid to chose colors, the worse that can happen is you don't like how it looks - and it's easy to fix Many paint stores have software that can take your pic and insert their colors. Here's a link for the one SWP uses - https://www.sherwin-williams.com/visualizer/#

Unless you intend to skim coat, I'd probably leave the ceiling texture alone. If you sand/scrape it unevenly, it will show. Walls aren't so tricky because you always have windows, doors, pics, furniture, etc breaking up your line of sight.
 
 

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