Porous Ceiling?


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Old 02-21-13, 06:49 PM
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Porous Ceiling?

Hey guys, I'm new to this forum and was hoping to get your expertise.
I'm currently painting the whole interior of a house and have run into a problem with the living room ceiling. The room is 26 x 12 and it receives a lot of light. My problem is that the ceiling is very porous in certain areas where there is direct light which gives the illusion of shadows at certain angles. As much as I hate doing ceilings, and having to do this one over again after already applying 2 coats, this is well below my standard, and I was hoping to hear your thoughts on it: what causes it, how to fix it, how to avoid it, ect.

I had the same problem on a different job a couple of months ago and I ended up oil-base priming the problem areas to fill in the pits and then re-applying paint.

I'm using Glidden ceiling paint as per the customers request with wooster 3/8 nap.
 
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Old 02-22-13, 04:27 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

Is this new construction? or a repaint? If new, did you prime the ceiling? Is the ceiling textured? or slick finish? How much paint per coat have you applied?

Paint isn't designed to fill in pits - that would be a job for a thin coat of joint compound. I usually use a 1/2" nap for slick ceilings, a larger nap if the ceiling is textured.
 
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Old 02-22-13, 05:56 AM
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Sorry, what do you mean by porous?
 
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Old 02-22-13, 03:07 PM
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I just mean it has a lot of little pits/craters in it.
 
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Old 02-22-13, 03:20 PM
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That's a finishing issue. I'd take some joint compound, thin it slightly and spread it over the holes. You only need enough mud to fill the defects. Sand when dry, remove the dust and repaint.
 
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Old 02-22-13, 03:21 PM
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It's a repaint, and slick finish, but the paint dried with little pits in certain areas. Between the 2 coats, I applied close to 2 gallons. I put it on liberally but not excessively. I'm just trying to figure out how to avoid this next time. It's an old house and God knows how many times that ceiling has been painted in the past, so maybe that has something to do with. Plus I know that flat ceiling paint is generally porous.
 
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Old 02-22-13, 03:24 PM
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I'm not overly fond of using ceiling paint. I've always been able to get better results with a mid grade wall paint - usually touches up better too

Was the ceiling fairly clean before you painted it?
 
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Old 02-22-13, 03:53 PM
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I agree. Wall paint is better and it's not as watered down either. I've used it on other projects but my current customer gave me that pink Glidden ceiling paint to work with. They said, "This should help you out because it goes on pink which is easier to see." I was thinking to myself, I've been painting long enough to tell the difference between wet and dry paint.

Yeah the ceiling was clean. But it had a lot of marks from the last job which was perhaps just shadowing from all the pits. I don't have time to skim coat it unless they really want me to (getting paid by the hour), so I'm just going to oil-base prime it in the noticeable spots to help fill in the holes. I've had success with this before but on a way smaller ceiling. Besides, the problem I see with using joint compound in just a few areas is that it will show up as smooth patches after the final coat. Really the biggest culprit here is the way the light hits the ceiling.

My question for you, Mark, and thanks for your time, is what ceiling paint have you had the most success with in your career? If you had to use ceiling paint and you wanted a near-flawless finish, what is your "go-to"?
 
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Old 02-23-13, 06:04 AM
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I've used a lot of different brands over the years but since I moved to east tenn, I've mostly used SWP coatings - mainly because they have multiple stores in the area with longer hours than their competitors. Most of my work was new construction so I mainly used ProMar 200 although if the budget was tight, I'd step down to ProMar 400 on the ceiling. I always tried to use the best paint for the price on the walls and trim. If I had to go cheap anywhere, it would be on the ceiling as it doesn't get washed or receive any wear. I try to never use paint that is only for ceilings.


If I remember right, I've only used that color changing ceiling paint once [a paint rep gave me a gallon to try] and I wasn't satisfied with it. I think I repainted the ceiling with ProMar 200.

As a contractor I've never liked doing jobs where the customer supplied the paint. If I supply the paint, I know I have the right coating [s] for the job at hand and have enough to finish the job without having to stop and go get more paint..... and I can get the paint at a contractor's discount.
 
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Old 02-23-13, 10:47 AM
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Thanks for the reply, Mark. It helped.
 
 

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