Best Paint Type for Kitchen Cabinets???


  #1  
Old 02-06-01, 08:11 PM
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The kitchen cabinets in my 80-year house were painted (rolled) with a semi-gloss latex. I'm guessing this was done in the last 2-3 years.

Around the cabinet knobs, where knuckles rub, I'm seeing bare wood. I suspect the cabinets were not primed.

What type of paint should I use? Oil based? Do I have to prime at this point? The Sherwin-Williams store said they've got a new latex that's durable like oil but goes on and cleans up like latex.

I'm taking a week off work and want to get it done correctly.

Thanks,
 
  #2  
Old 02-07-01, 06:01 AM
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I just re-painted some in my rent-house that had latex on them. What I did was run over them with 220 grit sand paper, fixed the minor imperfections with lightwieght shrinkfree spakeling, sanded the repairs with the 220, primed entirely with an oil based primer such as kilz or sealz-all, sand lightly after dry, caulk where needed with a PAINTABLE latex caulk smoothing with a wet finger and clean up with a wet rag, after dry I painted with Ben. Moores Impervo Gloss. They look very good.

While it is true that the paint companies are coming out with better and more durable latex paints, they will not flow out and feel as smooth as oil, and they may claim to be as durable as oil based but I have a hard time believing that, maybe close. Latex is easier to use, and a good quality latex such as Ben. Moores Impervo Latex Gloss or Sherwin Williams ProClassic Waterborne interior will work well if latex is the way you want to go.

Hope this helps.
 
  #3  
Old 02-07-01, 06:03 AM
mikejmerritt
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Yo! Pauly, Whats up! Great screen name. First, regardless or your choice for finish, you need to degloss at least the areas around the door and drawer pulls where it is raw to remove oils and whatever buildup. Light sanding should work for the rest. Do spot prime the raw areas with good oil primer like KILZ Original. After tack ragging they will be ready to paint. The paint S/W refers to is probably waterborne enamel. This paint falls between latex and oil in durability in my opinion. If you are not hard on your painted surfaces the waterborne will be durable enough. I must worn you the waterborne is difficult to use if brushing because it dries VERY fast. If a person is not fairly fast with a brush I would not attempt waterborne. If you do try it keep your home cold, this will help. After tacking the cabs will be ready for paint of your choice if your sure latex is what is on them now....Mike
 
  #4  
Old 02-07-01, 06:05 AM
mikejmerritt
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Hey Chip, We did it again!...LOL...Two minutes apart. Good thing we think alike....I'm going to get a cup and see what else you work out...Later
 
  #5  
Old 02-07-01, 06:08 AM
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Mike and myself are posting at the same time again, good point about the tack cloths, a definate must!
 
  #6  
Old 02-08-01, 11:04 AM
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Mike/Chip -

First, thanks for the great info.

One more question - Would I be better off using oil versus the latex waterborne you describe? I have two kids, so moderate to heavy cabinet traffic.
 
  #7  
Old 02-08-01, 02:14 PM
mikejmerritt
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I think I would go with the waterborne. I used it at our church and was noticing Sunday that it was really holding up well. The great thing about latex paints is in a year if they need a little freshening get a brush, go over the fronts of the doors down low, wash brush, dry in 30 minutes. Going back over latex jobs that are finished goes very fast. Stops the need to be so fussy with the kids to take care of them so much....Mike
 
 

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