Repairing popcorn ceiling


  #1  
Old 04-04-13, 05:32 PM
jmnew51's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: East Windsor, NJ
Posts: 407
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Repairing popcorn ceiling

I have to notch out my ceiling under the ceiling joists to run some wires for recessed lights. It's a popcorn ceiling and I'm not sure what the most efficient way to restore the popcorn to the repaired sites is. Can someone please advise me on this?

Thanx

Jim
 
  #2  
Old 04-05-13, 04:26 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,088
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
Popcorn is applied using a compressor powered hopper gun. There are 3 different sizes of popcorn; fine, medium and coarse. Popcorn repairs look best if you feather them out over a wide area. It's messy so you need to cover up everything! The ceiling might need to be repainted to make the repair blend in better. They also sell popcorn spray in an aerosol can.
 
  #3  
Old 04-05-13, 06:07 AM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,630
Received 98 Votes on 86 Posts
Just to clarify - you're not notching the joists themselves, right?
 
  #4  
Old 04-05-13, 10:24 AM
jmnew51's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: East Windsor, NJ
Posts: 407
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thank you for your replies. Yes mitch I'm notching out the joists so I can run the wires.

Jim
 
  #5  
Old 04-05-13, 10:33 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,088
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
Notching floor/ceiling joists is frowned upon because it weakens the joist. It's better to drill a hole in the middle of the joist although that does mean a bigger patch job.
 
  #6  
Old 04-05-13, 10:42 AM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,630
Received 98 Votes on 86 Posts
Yep, that's what I thought and Mark is right - drill holes through the middle 1/3 of the joist (not the entire 1/3 just within it) and run your wires through the holes.
 
  #7  
Old 04-05-13, 02:07 PM
jmnew51's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: East Windsor, NJ
Posts: 407
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
That's what I thought. I will drill holes instead of notching.

Thanx

Jim
 
  #8  
Old 04-06-13, 10:39 AM
M
Member
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 16
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I just repaired my ceiling and tried the aerosol kind and it worked pretty good, but it only covers a small area and was messy.
So I added dry granules to my paint instead because I had a few patches that needed repairing and didn't want the mess of spraying it on with the hopper.
It worked good and wasn't messy when I sponged it on rather than roll it.
 
  #9  
Old 04-07-13, 05:38 PM
jmnew51's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: East Windsor, NJ
Posts: 407
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for that idea MissesP. I will keep that in mind.

Jim
 
  #10  
Old 04-08-13, 03:48 PM
L
Member
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Canada
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Repairing popcorn ceiling

Hello,

I would like to ask for any suggestions about the following problem I am having with my popcorn ceiling.

I recently painted my popcorn ceiling for the first time (I used an oil based primer and then a water based ceiling paint) and some of the ceiling texture has started to flake off (please see attached photo). This has happened around the light fixture only.

The drywall is attached to the texture that is coming off. Underneath is a concrete slab (I live in a condominium).

Is it possible to repair this effectively without cutting out a section of the ceiling and replacing it? This is my first time painting, and I am definitely not capable of replacing drywall, especially surrounding a light fixture and on the ceiling.

I was considering removing the parts which are falling off and using the Homex popcorn ceiling patch (in the tube) to fill these parts in. I am not sure if this will adhere to concrete.

Any help would be much appreciated. I am also not sure why this part of the ceiling is coming off in the first place. Perhaps I saturated it with too much paint?

Thank you for any help!
 
Attached Images  
  #11  
Old 04-09-13, 02:57 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,088
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
Welcome to the forums lavieestbelle!

It almost looks like a moisture problem. Has there ever been any plumbing leaks above it? Is the ceiling concrete? or is it furred out with drywall installed to the furring strips?
 
  #12  
Old 04-09-13, 09:15 PM
L
Member
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Canada
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thank you so much for the quick reply marksr and the welcome!

So, the ceiling is concrete. I think that there might have been drywall and then the texture, as there are no furring strips (which are wood strips right?). Or maybe the popcorn is applied directly to concrete? Basically, there is concrete directly underneath the part that is falling off.

Also, there have been no leaks that I know of. The building is 8 years old and I've been living here for 3 years.

I just went and took another close look at the ceiling and I noticed that this cracking is happening in some other areas although it's not falling off like it is around the light fixture. I'm seeing this cracking around the fire alarm speaker and near the window.

I should mention this too: I really loaded the paint on the ceiling, since I was having trouble getting it to look even. In total I put 2 coats of oil primer and around 3 coats of latex ceiling paint.

Thanks again for your help! I'm a little worried that I may have to completely scrape the whole ceiling and re-do it...
 
  #13  
Old 04-10-13, 04:32 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,088
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
Often the ceiling texture is applied directly to the concrete although installing furring strips and drywall would look a little nicer and probably help with sound transfer. Often a trained eye can tell by looking at the ceiling, not sure if you can by pictures though

I couldn't imagine painting the ceiling a total of 5 times That makes my neck ache just thinking about it It might be you painted the ceiling too good.

It's possible there is a small amount of moisture passing thru the ceiling and the paint has sealed the ceiling to the extent that the moisture is looking for another spot for it's escape. The electrical boxes might be their new concentrated path.

Don't know that I can come up with a better solution than to scrape, repair, prime/paint and watch
 
  #14  
Old 04-11-13, 09:19 AM
L
Member
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Canada
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thank you again for the suggestions and help . I realized that there is drywall there too, but it's definitely come off with the textured ceiling.

My friend also recommended that I scrape/remove the affected areas, apply drywall compound, and then I can apply the textured ceiling repair compound, oil primer and finally the ceiling paint. Does this sound about right?

Just wondering though - do most dryall compounds (not sure if this is the correct term) adhere to concrete?

Well, at least I learned not to overpaint...
 
  #15  
Old 04-11-13, 09:28 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,088
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
Most drywall products including texture will bond to masonry but regular joint compound and most textures are water soluble and if the concrete absorbs and releases any moisture it can degrade the drywall mud. Also there is a limit to how thick regular j/c can be applied. For thick applications it's better to use a setting compound like Durabond. Setting compounds dry quickly by chemical reaction and are not water soluble.
 
  #16  
Old 04-12-13, 03:02 PM
L
Member
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Canada
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thank you so much for the suggestion and all the help and I will definitely look into purchasing the Durabond product that you recommended.

Cheers!
 
  #17  
Old 04-13-13, 04:18 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,088
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
Not all home/paint stores sell Durabond but most do sell setting compounds, another popular brand is EasySand ....... but none of the setting compounds sand as easy as regular j/c so it pays to apply it neatly. They come in different setting times. I'm partial to the 20 minute mud but the 45 or even 90 minute mud is more diy friendly. After it's mixed, any unused mud needs to be discarded and the tools cleaned up - it dries hard!
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: