orange peel on ceiling

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Old 04-14-13, 02:47 PM
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orange peel on ceiling

hello,
back a month ago, i rolled a wall of a bedroom with some paint that was slightly thick. The result was that my wall has orange peel look to it.

Figuring that the paint was the culprit of this, i decided to purchase a high quality paint (Dulux) to paint the ceiling and avoid another orange peel look. Well, result is that I have a ceiling with heavy orange peel!!!

i don't know why, i used a good quality paint, could the roller sleeve cause the orange peel?
 
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Old 04-14-13, 03:13 PM
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It's likely the nap of roller cover you are using. Select a roller that says it is for "smooth" walls. Generally less nap means smoother walls. Not all roller covers are created equal either. Buy a quality roller cover if you want a better finish. Woven covers are usually best for smooth walls.
 
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Old 04-14-13, 05:23 PM
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could this also be a result of putting on too much paint onto the ceiling?
i really thought that orange peel only occurred as a result of thick paint.
 
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Old 04-14-13, 05:34 PM
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Thicker nap rollers (like 1/2" and 3/4") hold a lot more paint and will put more of it on the wall, so yes, the two are related. So that's why I was suggesting that it might be the nap on your roller, but the type of roller is also a factor. We are left guessing what sort of roller you used to apply the paint.
 
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Old 04-15-13, 04:07 AM
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Orange peel from paint is normally the difference between sprayed and rolled on paint. Some paints are more prone to it than others. Sometimes an additive like Flood's Floetrol or XIM's extender will help the paint flow together better by slowing the drying time which reduces or eliminates the orange peel.

Using too thick a nap often results in roller stipple which is a little different than orange peel. It's also possible that the orange peel is already in place but just wasn't noticeable until you applied the fresh coat of paint.

What size/type roller cover did you use? Is the paint flat or enamel?
 
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Old 04-15-13, 05:34 AM
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sorry about that, i totally forgot to mention that I was using a 1/2" sleeve (for semi and semi smooth surfaces...so it said on the packaging) in looking back at my ceiling with a light against the ceiling at night, i noticed a whole lot of roller lint left behind, so safe to assume that the quality of the sleeve was not adequate. The reason I want to validate if this is the doing of the sleeve is that someone recommend I use this quality paint on all my ceilings... but as you can imagine I am kind of skeptical at this time cause I can't isolate the problem.
 
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Old 04-15-13, 05:37 AM
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Correction

Correction: the packaging on the roller sleeve said, for smooth or semi-smooth surfaces.... 1/2"
 
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Old 04-15-13, 11:19 AM
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I rarely ever use a roller cover less than 1/2" shorter naps hold less paint = more work

It does sound like you used one of the cheaper roller covers. Personally I hate to use any cover that uses synthetic fibers.... but I'm an old school painter and those covers do cost significantly more
My 2 biggest complaints with them is they have more roller spray and tend to leave an orange peel on slick substrates. Many customers/painters don't notice or have a problem with the slight orange peel.

Wooster is one of the better brands of roller covers. There are several other good brands but my brain doesn't want to let me remember at the moment Cheap roller covers are bad to shed. Sometimes washing a cover before it's first use will eliminate or minimize shedding. I've never had any issues with lambs wool covers but as stated earlier - they are the most expensive.
 
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Old 04-15-13, 11:54 AM
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Ok, thanks for the info,I was totally discouraged cause I thought I had a cheap paint in my hands, little did I ever expect that the problem could have resulted from a cheap roller. I overlooked this part. By curiosity can you tell me what other factors tell me what the differnce is between stippling and orange peel?
 
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Old 04-15-13, 12:06 PM
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Orange peel texture is normally a drywall product that is sprayed on. It can also be caused by paint that is too thick for the spray gun that is applying it. Sometimes it can be duplicated with the right roller cover and paint.

Roller stipple is the 'texture' that is left behind from rolling. The heavier the nap [relative to the slickness of the substrate] the more prominent the stipple will be.

I'm at a loss for the correct words to describe stipple but orange peel is very similar to the peel on a orange. Roller stipple isn't quite as uniform as orange peel.

I've applied a LOT of paint over the years, some cheap paint, some good. I can do a decent job of applying most any grade of paint but I would struggle to get a decent looking job with inferior rollers/brushes.
 
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Old 04-15-13, 12:33 PM
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Orange peel is applied texture - I doubt you had that and did not know it. It's been my experience that orange peel texture stands out less with each coat of paint.

Roller stipple, IMO, is the uneven layer of paint left behind by a roller due to it not being flat to the surface of the wall (the applicator has depth compared to the wall and sometimes leaves thicker spots of paint); the thicker the nap, the heavier the stipple.

Edit: I must be really slow today, Mark posted most of what I said nearly 20 minutes before I did
 
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Old 04-15-13, 07:19 PM
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Roller stipple is caused by the nap of the roller pulling slightly as you roll and "lifting" the paint up as you make the pass. This can be because of thick paint, too large of a nap or over-rolling the surface. If you continually went back and forth over the same area too many times it will result in a less than smooth surface. The roller has applied the paint to the wall, excessive rolling makes the roller try to pull the paint back off the wall and into the fibers. Particularly if you laid on a heavy coat of paint to begin with.

Some stipple is a good thing. I know that I try to back roll all of the edge cuts I made with a brush to ensue that the roller stipple blends into the brush stroked areas for a more finished look. Well I get as close as I can without scraping the adjacent wall.
 
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Old 04-16-13, 04:51 AM
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thank you for all the feedback. much appreciated. I'll take all this good advice for my upcoming project!
 
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