painting oak..hidding the grain with spackling compound


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Old 06-10-13, 06:34 AM
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painting oak..hidding the grain with spackling compound

Hi all
I’m about to pain my old oak cabinets…
Never been crazy about the look of oak and my wife agreed to reuse the existing cabinets instead of trashing them in order to get noew ones… but if we were wo keep the old cabinets then they had to be painted.
I’ve been doing some research online and have come across many differences in opinion regarding painting oak and the fact that the grain will show through once painted.

From what I’ve see, one way to reduce or do way with that grain is to use spackling compound after the first coat of primer. One particular blog I read the lady used Durabond drywall compound to fill in the grain. Super thin coat, just enough to fill the voids .
Then prime again, sand, paint, sand , paint….repeat if necessary

For the spackling compound… would this be the type of stuff you would use?
Dap | 237ML, Pink, DryDex Spackling | Home Depot Canada

or something like this?
LePage | LePage® PolyTM Fix 3L | Home Depot Canada

are they pretty much the same product just the other being pink when wet?

And the difference between those and Durabond? Durabond is just harder?

Any pros and cons on using either one of these as fillers for the grain?

Thanks
 
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Old 06-10-13, 06:41 AM
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Why not use a product made just for this?
http://www.rockler.com/how-to/using-wood-grain-filler/
 
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Old 06-10-13, 07:00 AM
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joecaption1
that's an interesting product.. I've used wood putty which would be a pain for larger surfaces... but the stuff in your link is more fluid from what they are saying...
not sure If I could find that stuff here, would have to order direct from Rockler

just found this on LeeValley.
Elmer's® Wood Filler - Lee Valley Tools

they make the claim that you simply dilute this stuff for filling pores. that wood filler is available pretty much in all stores... might be the easiest way to go
 
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Old 06-10-13, 08:08 AM
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Yeah you've got the right idea. Just use the wood filler, but like you said in your original post.. do thin coats. Good luck, let us know how things are progressing!
 
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Old 06-10-13, 08:32 AM
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just bought a small container of the elmer's wood filler to do a test
how much would you dilute this ?
 
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Old 06-10-13, 09:22 AM
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I doubt that wood filler will work well - it's more for making repairs to damaged wood. The Joe linked to will work but I've used joint compound many times - mainly because I had it on hand. After applying an ultra thin coat - after drying, sand it ALL off. That only leaves the filler in the grain itself. This would be done after the 1st coat of primer but would require another coat of primer after the filler is sanded and all dust removed.

Depending on how well the oak was finished to start with, the open grain might not be much of an issue. It is a big issue with raw oak but often the finishes previously used will fill some of the grain.

The first coat of primer needs to be solvent based - it along with sanding will insure adhesion. If you plan paint the cabinets white, it's best to use a quality latex or waterborne enamel. Oil base white enamels are bad to yellow over time.
 
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Old 06-10-13, 11:33 AM
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so you say you have used joint compound for this purpose? in other words something like Durabond would work or do you use to top coat type stuff? like the premixed compounds?

as for the Elmer wood filler... it says it works for scratches as well so I can't see why it wouldn't work. you think it would not hold and flake off over time?

also, you mention the primer should be solvent based
would this be solvent based? how can you tell? what product defines it as solvent based?
Zinsser | Zinnser Bin Primer -946Ml | Home Depot Canada
 
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Old 06-10-13, 01:53 PM
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BIN would be the ultimate primer, it's shellac based. An oil base primer would be 2nd best [usually good enough] both are solvent based. Basically any coating that uses a solvent as a thinner is considered solvent based.

I would not use durabond - it's too hard to sand. Pre mix j/c works fine, remember you want to sand it all off leaving only what remains in the pores of the grain. IMO the elmers would be too difficult to work with for this type of job, it's better suited for thicker type repairs.
 
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Old 06-10-13, 05:48 PM
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thought about that....about how hard that might be to sand as Durabond is hard like cement...and,actually, the regular joint compound is probably more flexible and less prone to cracking than Durabond no?
Durabond is a compound designed as a base layer to provide strength, in this case strength is not required but flexibility would be...you just convinced me between the two
 
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Old 06-11-13, 03:27 AM
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I'm not sure how much flexibility comes into play. Remember, you want to sand as much j/c off as possible! You don't want/need any over the wood, just in the open grain.
 
 

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