painting interior woodwork


  #1  
Old 02-12-01, 08:54 PM
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my house is about 40-50 years old. prior owners painted the place when they moved in (about 5 years ago).

woodwork is starting to chip in lots of areas. i can see the old paint underneath.

how do i prepare the surface, for a paint job, that won't crack/peel/chip?--for as long a time as possible? specifically, i've noticed on one windowsill that paint is cracking. underneath, i can see the old paint (looks like that is cracking,too). and i've noticed some black moldy looking stripes, perhaps where moisture got into the paint, then caused the paint to crack?

i'd love to totally strip the windowsill down to the wood, but i'm afraid the undercoat has lead in the paint. is there any way to strip down, and not have to worry releasing lead? i want to eliminate the moldy stripes, too. for obvious reasons, i don't want to sand. but i'm afraid if i don't sand or strip the wood, i'll see the same process occurring in a couple of years.

thanks for any help.
 
  #2  
Old 02-14-01, 05:51 AM
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You can strip the sills, I believe Peel-away is safe for stripping lead based paint but be sure to read the label and ask the rep to be sure. Below is a list of lead paint sites for you to read over.

http://www.epa.gov/opptintr/lead/
http://www.asbestos.org/
http://www.homestoreproducts.com/ Testing kits

I would like you to do a little test on the rest of the wood, go to your paint store and get a small container of Goof-Off, with a rag rub the Goof-Off on a hidden area, if the paint starts to come off it is latex, if it does not then it is oil based, come back and tell us what the existing outer layer of paint is.





[Edited by Chipfo on 02-14-01 at 08:59]
 
  #3  
Old 02-14-01, 06:44 PM
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can i use goo-gone?

i noticed that you wrote goof off? i happen to have some goo gone. can i use this instead? (i believe it is a citrus based product).

i really appreciate your help.
 
  #4  
Old 02-15-01, 05:27 AM
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Goo gone probably does about the same thing, goof off is not citris based however, it is zylene based(among other thinners), read on the label and see if it states that it will remove latex paint while leaving oil based paint untouched, That is the key to it.
 
  #5  
Old 02-15-01, 08:13 PM
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goo gone

i guess i'm going to have to break down & hit h.d. this weekend for goof off.

check in this weekend, and i'll let you know the results.
 
  #6  
Old 02-18-01, 07:02 PM
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results of paint test

chip,

i'm guessing the paint is latex.

i applied a small amount, and after some rubbing, seemed to get sticky and come off. then, i applied another small amount, and let sit for a while. rubbed again with the rag, the paint rubbed off, and the paint color is definitely showing up on the rag. (it does take a little rubbing though, and there must be two layers, as i can see another layer of paint in the same color--maybe a primer?)

i haven't even touched the bottom layer (the layer that maybe was the original?)

what should i do next?

thank you,
lisa
 
  #7  
Old 02-18-01, 08:18 PM
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lad,

Yes, the paint must be latex, Goof-off will not do that with oil based paints. If you are looking for a more durable paint than what is already on there you need to go with a quality oil based paint, I also will suggest priming, it is not absolutely nesasary since it is already painted (if you were going latex over oil, then you need to re-prime), but I would suggest re-priming for 2 reasons, 1- even better durability, 2- smoother finish.
Make sure the surface is clean and free of any oil or grease, Dirtex or TSP works great. Sand lightly with a 220 grit, feathering any exposed paint edges, for minor repairs use lightweight shrink free spakeling, when dry sand smooth, remove all dust and use a tack cloth. Prime with an oil based primer such as Kilz, allow to dry and sand lightly with the 220 grit (for smoothness) Remove dust and tack off. Caulk were needed with a PAINTABLE latex caulk, smoothing with a wet finger and clean any excess with a damp rag (get a bucket of water and a rag) Allow to dry completely. Then 2 coats of quality oil based paint, I prefer gloss, at least semi-gloss. Watch for runs and you can thin slightly with paint thinner if it is dragging to much.

Or you could clean and sand lightly and go back with a quality pro paint store latex trim paint (tell the rep. it is for trim) But will not be as durable as the above directions, or as smooth.

 
  #8  
Old 02-22-01, 06:35 PM
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continued

you mention sanding. bearing in mind that the very bottom layer could contain lead, is it still okay to sand? it sounds like you are suggesting a very light sanding. so, this light sanding will not touch the bottom layer?

and what about the mold streaks? will the tsp or kils remove the moldy streaks?
 
  #9  
Old 02-22-01, 08:03 PM
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Adding a little bleach to the TSP solution or 3 parts water to 1 part bleach in a spray bottle will take care of the mold, then proceed as normal.

If you are afraid there is lead based paint, then read up on protecting yourself in the links above, I would definately wear a proper dust mask (good idea whether lead is present or not) Lightly sanding should not go through multi layers of paint.
 
 

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