textured ceiling


  #1  
Old 02-13-01, 09:59 AM
Torch
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Question

I am finishing my basement and using drywall on the walls and ceiling. I would like for the ceiling in the basement to match the ceilings in the rest of the house. When the house was built 2 years ago, the drywall guys put a textured finish on and left it unpainted. They used some type of thinned out drywall mud and a roller. The roller appeared to be a hard plastic with a flower type design on it. The ceilings are stipled with a pattern (it doesn't really look like a flower to me).

Any ideas on how I can duplicate this and where I can buy this roller? I know it isn't one of the texture paint rollers that you can find in the paint dept. at Home Depot.
 
  #2  
Old 02-13-01, 07:31 PM
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Boy, there are so many textures, I even make up textures for clients like Mexican Resturaunts. In all honesty it sounds as if it is one of those texture rollers found at hardware/paint stores. I would go aroung the paint stores and see if I couldn't find a close match, or if you have a good camera you could take a closeup and post it or take it to the paint stores with you, site-unseen I cannot tell you exactly what it is. Maybe you could hire a painter or drywaller to come out and give you his/her 2 cents.
 
  #3  
Old 02-14-01, 06:43 AM
Torch
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I'll look again at the rollers, but I still need to figure out how they were mixing the drywall mud. I know the texture is not paint because I can use a wet rag and remove some of it (like wet sanding drywall) and the builder told me the ceilings were not painted. Could they have been mixing drywall topping compound with water and rolling it on? If so, do I just have to practice and get the proportions right? A little guidance could go a long way here...
 
  #4  
Old 02-14-01, 03:00 PM
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Yes, it is thinned drywall compound, I usually will get the boxes of mud (ready mix), transfer to a 5 gallon bucket and add water up until about 3 inches from the top, mix well with either a paddle (requires 1/2 inch drill chuck) or the stomper, it looks like a big potatoe masher, the paint mixers that attach to a drill will do little good for mud in a 5 gallon bucket. Mix the mud until it is smooth and free of lumps, the stomper will take a good arm and about 5 minutes or slightly longer. You will have to experiment to get a match, start off a little thick and thin down as needed, you may even get a sheet of sheetrock to practice and experiment on, letting it dry as mud will shrink as it does, especially thinned mud.

I just thought of something, could it be crows foot? They sell the tool at most paint stores. It looks as if it is made of the same material as natural bristle kitchen brooms (but is not) except the bristles are sticking all out sideways (from the bottom of the handle), faned out all around the handle and it is used by rolling the mud on the wall with a regular thick napped paint roller or splattered with a hopper and stopped with the crows foot tool. Check out that tool too while your looking and you should know if that is it by seeing it.

[Edited by Chipfo on 02-14-01 at 06:07]
 
 

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