Oops! This is an embarrasing oil question.

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Old 02-15-01, 04:42 PM
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I'm painting something small for a clients wall. I was told it was acrylic latex from the previous paint job. I could really kick myself, but I didn't test the wall. I think it must have been oil because ofcourse the latex paint I'm using is not staying on the wall. Plus I taped up a stencil, with weak tape and it took off some of the original paint. My question is an embarrasing one to ask, cause I'm pretty sure I know the answer. Does anyone know of a miracle fix? Something I can use to seal what I've already painted. I thought about adding a bit of water to sobo craft glue and applying that to what I've painted to seal it to the latex and possible oil. I know it's not the best thing to do...But my client has allergies and I'm trying to avoid sanding and fumes. Any response would be greatly appreciated.
 
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Old 02-16-01, 07:26 AM
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Oil based paint, and tape pulled it off? Sounds like the previous paint job was not properly preped if tape is pulling it off, well neverless. I know of no product that will seal the new latex to the oil without fumes, even an oil based primer will adhere to the existing oil and help hold down the latex, but if the latex is peeling I would not attempt to seal it in. If it is at all possible, you could close off the room you are working in (hang plastic, close door, etc), put a fan in the window and use a rag and goof-off to remove the stenciling you have already painted on, heck, try hot water and TSP and scrub it off, if the latex is new then some TSP and elbow grease may work good enough to go back over it with the proper paint, but TSP may dull the existing oil paint.

I have never thinned and applied glue to the wall so I cannot comment on it, but to tell you the truth, probably wouldn't even consider it.

I will also add this, I have lost money before on small jobs (or a portion of a large job) by mistakes, going ahead and fixing it right for the good of bussiness, what I mean is, going ahead and re-painting the wall and re-stenciling it. I would try to fix it first but not spend a lot of time on the quik fix, by the time you try all the quik fixes you can try, you could have already had the whole wall painted and on your way.
 
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Old 02-16-01, 03:49 PM
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Hey chipfo,,,Im so glad we don`t use "latex over here because it seems to react with different finishes too easily. Im not saying that your products are inferior to ours...It just that it seems that you really have to think through what you are doing far more than we do "over" here in regards to paint compatibility.
 
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Old 02-16-01, 06:35 PM
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Wink the oil goof

Chipfo- thanks for the advice. I agree with you on evrything but of course I'm still looking for other solutions before I go back and start all over for free. It's my mistake and I do want to be professional and conduct a well run business. But one more idea...What about water based polycrylic? It has little fumes and covers oil and latex paint on wood walls. Any ideas?...There's no way to close off the room and frankly I just want to get this job done with very little hassle to the client, and be out of there! It's one of those "problem" jobs. Thanks again for any advice.
 
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Old 02-17-01, 07:32 AM
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You could use a Quality water based primer like Zinsser's 1-2-3, it is formulated for use on glossy surfaces such as oil based paint, ceramic, etc. You would want to lightly sand the area to be primed of course with a 220 grit for a better bite, but should work fine. Also Mikejmerrit mentioned a product he likes well in this thread http://forum.doityourself.com/showth...threadid=49533


Toptosher, you are serious about useing only oil based paints, boy I have used oil paint for all the interior walls and the exterior on customers request, I wouldn't want to do it all the time, but if that is what you are acustom to then it would be normal. The people that I used oil paint entirely on is an older couple that explained "We are never going to change our minds and paint again, we want to be able to scrub these walls and never re-paint them in our lifes" I also can see the day here in N. America where they are going to do away with oil paint and revert to only latex, for environmental reasons, and with the latex paints getting better and better, it may not be too far away, as a matter of fact I know a residental painter that can't wait for the day, I myself still like oil on wood trim, cabinets, doors and some industrial application where latex wouldn't hold up.

Good day all.
 
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Old 02-17-01, 10:59 AM
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I think I have caused some confusion!! Sorry!!
The water based paint that we use in the U.K for walls have no compatibility problems over gloss or oil based paints.

Of course an oil based wall must be prepared correctly so that adhesion is good.
Im almost certain that the water based emulsion that we use is not latex based.
Gloss is rarely seen painted on walls(except for prisons,hospitals etc)
In the past we used to use an oil based paint called "eggshell" This is a semi gloss finish that provides a tough,washable finish and provides an exellent base for special finishes,such as rag rolling and marbling...Now, even this paint has a water based equivelent (soft sheen)which does the same job,is low odour and non yellowing.
We do however have washable paints that contain "vinyl".
Non of these paints have compatibility problems as far as I know.

I wonder if "latex" is actualy vinyl...It would be good to know(just in case im ever required to work in the states)!!
Who knows!!



 
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Old 02-18-01, 07:16 AM
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Yes I was confused, thanks for clearing that up.
We do have vinyl paints here also, but most of the waterbased paints are latex, the vinyl paint even smells different and is marked as vinyl. I will say however when most painters I know refer to waterbased paint (be it latex, vinyl, or waterborne) they will call it latex. They too will adhere to oil based paint when preped properly, with an oil primer is my recomendations but as I stated above there are water based primers that adhere to oil paint well also.

Happy Painting!
 
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