Best/most forgiving primer and paint


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Old 08-24-13, 10:14 AM
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Best/most forgiving primer and paint

Hey guys I'm jus finishing all the drywall work I did and patched up the only recessed tube lights with high hats and fans. Everything is almost ready to be primed. I'm no pro but my tape and mud came out decent but I'm sure not perfect. I'm looking for the most forgiving primer. I'm getting the hint from reading on here that the ones that are sprayed on is better. I most likely have access to a good sprayer if that's the case just wasnt sure bc there are some cabinets in and counter tops that are adjacent and on walls that are being painted.

Also half of the wall being painted had wall paper on. It was 32 years old and just pulled right off did not have to scrape anything. But there is a texture on the wall still. Thinking if I lightly sand and prime it will be fine right?

What's the best brand paint to go with for the ceiling and walls? All I have used is Home Depot which I think is bear and it's horrible. What finishes should I use I know it's preference but I'm not good with this stuff. Think flat for the ceiling and semi gloss for the walls. It's a basement apt but with 10ft ceilings and full window
s thanks as always
 
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Old 08-24-13, 02:28 PM
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Paint is not going to mask a poor tape and mud job, in fact it will enhance the visibility of the work done to the wall. To best get a feel of what kind of sanding job you have done, take a utility light or flash light or table lamp and hold the bulb tight to the wall. Shine the light across the seams that you finished and it will show you where you need to do additional fine tuning of the walls. Do this now, before you apply any paint or primer.

Use some hot water sprayed onto the wall with the paper and see if you can get the glue residue (your texture) to soften. You can then scrape it off down to a smooth wall. Check that wall for fit and finish like you did the others and correct as needed. Many times if the drywall people new that wall paper was going to be used, they did not put as much effort into the finished wall. Again, do this before you paint anything.

Flat paint will do the best to hide imperfections. Eggshell will be the worst if the walls are rough.
 
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Old 08-24-13, 02:36 PM
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Primers and paint don't really fix defects in the drywall! Hi build primers help a little but you really need a good level substrate to start with. Hi build primers must be sprayed on but it takes a pretty stout airless to pump the primer. Smaller airless pumps would need the hi build primer thinned which negates any build up properties. IMO you are better off inspecting the wall while the primer is wet to see where the bad spots are, go back and fix those areas, reprime and then apply your finish paint.

Unless you are certain all the wallpaper adhesive was removed you need to coat the wall with either an oil base primer or Zinnser's Gardz.

You'll find the better coatings at your local paint store, just be sure to get their mid line or better as they also sell cheap coatings similar to what the big box sells. Flat paint is the most common for ceilings although a bath rm with shower would need a latex enamel on the ceiling and walls. IMO semi-gloss is too shiny for residential walls [it will also highlight any defects] you'd be better off with an eggshell or satin latex enamel for the finish coat. Flat latex is the most forgiving on imperfect walls but isn't as washable as an enamel.
 
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Old 08-25-13, 08:37 AM
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Thanks for the advice guys. I know the mud job has to be perfect first wasnt sure if brand of primer made any difference.
I have few questions hopefully you can help.
Background-32 year old home, basement, 4ft up was wood panel that I replace with sheet rock. Then a sheet rock 9" sill, then 4ft up which was wallpaper directly glued to the old drywall(no primer or paint) Which came off with a pull. The residue is directly on the dry wall.
Questions- I read to sand this then use the gardz. Than skim coat than prime (use this using regular primer) than sand (does everything primed need to be sanded after?

The ceiling is white and I have 2' and 4' holes from the old lights that I patched, taped and mudded. Can I just prime these, lite sand(220) than paint. Or do I need to prime the hole ceiling? It's not it bad shape but has been aged
 
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Old 08-25-13, 11:04 AM
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Using the right primer makes a difference depending on the substrate that is being sealed and the type of paint that is being applied over the primer .... that's why there are so many different types of primer.

I'm a little surprised that the wallpaper came off of the unpainted drywall with little to no effort. Normally that's the most difficult paper to strip. It is a good idea to sand and then apply Gardz! The condition of the wall determines whether or not j/c needs to be added. Joint compound should always be primed. The repairs can be spot primed and sanded although sometimes it's better/easier to prime the entire ceiling - it really depends on the condition of the ceiling and if there is any big color differences between the old and new paint.
 
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Old 08-25-13, 12:51 PM
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If the drywall paper has been compromised, Gardz may or may not save the drywall. Once the paper is compromised, any moisture causes the layers of paper underneath to bubble up once you try to skim coat it. The paper compromise also reduces the strength of the drywall to the point that a small bump may cause if to dent of pop a hole from the impact. Gypsum itself has little integrity, note how easy it is to score and snap. It is the paper on both sides that makes it strong. Not being able to see the extent of the damage, I can't really say and your description is just vague enough to cause me to question what you actually have there. Is it possible to get us some pictures of what you are looking at? Gardz is pricey, want to make sure you have a fighting chance before you spend the money.
 
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Old 08-29-13, 07:18 AM
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Thanks for the reply guys. Yeah it pulled right off you can just see a haze on the drywall and feel a little rough, a few people said just to sand it and use an all in one primer from zinsar. I sanded a small area down it took two seconds and it was smooth
 
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Old 08-29-13, 02:04 PM
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Drywall in and of itself does not "sand". You sand the joints between sheets, but the overall wall does not get sanded. What you have described is raw gypsum. It has zero integrity without the overlaying piece of paper that it is sandwiched between. It needs to be replaced.
 
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Old 08-29-13, 02:14 PM
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Before I'd agree with replacing the wall I'd like to see a pic or two of the wall to know for sure if all the face paper was removed from the drywall or if what was sanded was just adhesive or some other substance on the drywall paper.
 
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Old 08-30-13, 05:16 AM
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Thanks for the replys. I will try to get a pic tonight but the drywall paper is completely intake it's just the residue that was sanded down def no need to replace
 
 

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