whitewash painting


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Old 02-23-01, 09:25 AM
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I have been told you can get a "whitewash" effect by thinning paint with water. No one seems to know exactly how to do this. Can anyone help?? Any replies would be appreciated!
 
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Old 02-24-01, 06:16 AM
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You can use latex paint thinned about in half with water to whitewash with, I don't much care for the effect plus the water raises the grain in the wood. I prefer to use an oil based white thinned about in half with paint thinner, I have been useing this mixture for years on new home cabinets and it is very "in" right now here. I usually use an oil semigloss paint, it helps to seal the wood slightly also so it doesn't soak up the sanding sealer as much.

What is it you are wanting to whitewash? New wood?
 
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Old 02-24-01, 07:36 AM
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Smile whitewash painting

Thank you so much for your reply! I have seen "whitewashed" look walls and was interested in trying the look. The walls I have are plaster and drywall. We have a house that will soon be 100 years old and I thought it would be more authentic looking.
 
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Old 02-25-01, 06:07 AM
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I am sorry, I have never whitewashed sheetrock or plaster walls, when I hear whitewashing I automatically think of cabinets and woodwork, sounds like a type of faux finish. Are you thinking of a based coat of paint and whitewashing on top of that? I take back my above statement of useing oil based paint, this may not be the solution for walls. Here are some faux links to look at until you get a proper responce.

http://www.fauxlikeapro.com/

http://www.decoratingplus.com/pr01.htm

http://www.learnfree-home.com/faux-painting/


[Edited by Chipfo on 02-25-01 at 09:15]
 
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Old 02-25-01, 12:34 PM
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Is it a white washed look you want or a plaster look like you might see in a cottage.
 
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Old 02-26-01, 09:48 AM
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We call it Colour wash!! It is basically a thin waterbased or oil based paint mixed with a clear oilbase or waterbase glaze....The paint is mixed with glaze so that you have more time to work with the stuff without it drying too quickly. This mixture is then painted onto a wall that has been prepared and painted with a semi-gloss finish. Then the whole wall is dry brushed (3 to 4 inch brush) to leave the desired effect(brush stroke pattern). If required the effect can be sofened with an extremly soft brush to make the effect more subtle.
You can create hundreds of different & individual looks with this tecnique depending on the colours of your basecoat and tinted glaze.

I did write to someone on this topic last week so i have cut & paste that below........


There are no hard and fast rules for colour wash...Of course the base coat must be dry and non pourus but apart from that...experiment and have fun. depending on wether you are using oil or water based glazes...they should always stay "alive" long enough for you to practice and achieve an effect that you like. Practice first on small area s untill you are happy with the results. Get to know how wet,and semi dry glazes behave before attempting a whole wall section and practice random brush strokes too.
Broken colour effects are always individual and rarely look the same. Unfortunatly I have`nt set up a page for colour wash yet but take a look t the link below and maybe learn something about applying tinted glazes http://www.aceoftrades.homestead.com/sponging.html
brush strokes can be soft`nd using a very soft bristled brush such as a badger softener....Have fun!!


One example of colourwash........



[Edited by toptosher on 02-26-01 at 02:45]
 
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Old 02-26-01, 01:19 PM
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Smile whitewash painting

THANKS FOR ALL THE HELP AND ADVICE! I'VE BEEN READING THE SUGGESTED LINKS WHICH ARE VERY INFORMATIVE. I THINK I'M REALLY GOING TO LIKE THIS SITE. THANKS AGAIN!
 
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Old 02-26-01, 01:57 PM
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Your welcome!
 
 

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