Painting elastomeric paint with roller

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Old 12-23-13, 08:10 AM
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Painting elastomeric paint with roller

The Sherwin williams guy told me that elastomeric paint is only good if its applied right. I am assuming applied right means putting on the correct wet/dry film thickness and covering all areas without gap. I am first time painter and trying to DIY the painting job.

1) I don't have a spray painter. Can I just roll the elastomeric paint instead ? If no, is there a cheap sprayer that would work for this job ?

2)How do you control the film thickness as you roll ? How do you know if you will need a third coat of paint because you applied too little with elastomeric paint?

3) What kind of roller should I use ?

4) Is there a special technique in painting elastomeric paint ?
 
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Old 12-23-13, 10:15 AM
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You can only spray elastromeric paint with the heavy duty type airless and even then you might have to remove the filters in order for the airless to pump it. Even if you did have an airless stout enough to pump elastormeric, you'd still have to back roll in order to work the paint into the substrate.

Applying the paint uniformly is pretty much the same no matter what material you use. What do you intend to apply the elastomeric too? I normally only apply 1 coat of elastomeric over primed or prepainted masonry. I'll pretty much slop it on and then as the roller dries out, back roll to even it out. What size roller cover to use depends mostly on the texture of the substrate. 3/4" is ok for smooth sand finish stucco but rough stucco might require up to an 1.5" nap.
 
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Old 12-23-13, 10:24 AM
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Mark, this was originally in Bricks, Masonry and I moved it here. So I'm assuming that's where it's being used.
Not sure if it should be here or there?
 
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Old 12-23-13, 10:28 AM
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This should be the right forum Elastomeric paint is a coating that is normally applied to masonry but there are a few other applications. If the OP will let us know what type of substrate it's going to be applied to, we can better answer the application questions.
 
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Old 12-23-13, 11:01 AM
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Thanks for the quick reply. The home is a 1965 build ranch home. All exterior is stucco. There were in total about 15 cracks all around the house. House is on a 7000 sq ft lot. Its located in Santa Barbara approx. 1 mile from the beach.

The stucco condition is decently good. Here are some of the pictures

https://www.dropbox.com/sc/c7ffu7mbcdiyxv2/2xT36xJaBQ

As you can see I will also need to hide the new stucco around the patio doors and windows.
 
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Old 12-23-13, 12:18 PM
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I couldn't view the pics

I normally caulk all but the minor cracks [assuming none are big enough to need mortar] Elastomeric paint will span minor cracks but not always the bigger ones. If the current paint is chalky [and it won't wash off], I'd use a latex primer with 25% Flood's Emulsa Bond added for the 1st coat. That will bind up the chalk [paint won't adhere well to chalky surfaces] Then you can apply the elastomeric.
 
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Old 12-23-13, 12:37 PM
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Mark, give it a minute for the page to load. I thought I couldn't see them at first, then all of a sudden they were there!
 
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Old 12-23-13, 12:43 PM
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That coating is not going to hide those miss matched repairs.
I'd fix or replace that trim and door before doing anything.
 
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Old 12-23-13, 12:46 PM
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Thanks Shadie! I thought I had give them enough time but I guess I gave up a second or two too soon

I remember those pics from a previous thread Obviously you'll need to prime all the new stucco, I'd consider priming all the stucco. I'd probably use a 1" nap roller cover. I've always been partial to the lambswool covers but they are more expensive. Most younger painters seem to prefer the synthetic covers. I'd expect a coat of primer followed by one coat of elastomeric to last 10 yrs, maybe longer providing everything is prepped correctly.
 
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Old 12-23-13, 02:29 PM
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Yes Mark you are right. I posted the same pics earlier but at that time I was considering doing a fog coat but soon enough I realized the house has been painted( I chipped off the paint when I accidentally pointed the power washer at the stucco).

Ok so my takeaways till now are door trim needs to go, prime whole house or the unprimed surfaces. I don't see any chalking in the stucco for now.

Regarding the mismatched repairs......that is the most problematic part. How do I hide them. I was hoping to just smoothen them with a sandpaper and then paint over them. Especially this patch at front of the house is a problem.

https://www.dropbox.com/sc/c7ffu7mbcdiyxv2/UgLGDUsPGQ/7
https://www.dropbox.com/sc/c7ffu7mbc.../-zr1_Z5B2_/12

Also, we decided to use a smaller patio door so there is about a 3ft wall that has been restucco'd next to the door whose texture doesn't match the rest of wall. Even after I sand it the wall will have smooth texture while the rest of the wall has those trowel marks.

My main confusion is will sanding, priming and painting hide these issues ? What would you do in similar situation ?
 
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Old 12-23-13, 03:00 PM
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I doubt sanding the stucco will help although sometimes 'scrubbing' it with a piece of brick or cinder block will 'sand' it down some. I don't know if that will fix it but it's worth a try. It's possible more stucco might need to be applied by someone that is better at matching the existing. It will be up to you to decide what you will accept, are able to do or can afford to have done. Paint alone won't change the texture any but having everything the same color will help it not to stick out as bad.

If it was my house, I'd get the stucco repairs as good as I could, caulk where needed, prime the entire house with either a latex siding or masonry primer [house paint thinned 10% will also work] and then apply a full fluid coat of elastomeric.
 
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Old 12-23-13, 03:34 PM
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Thanks Mark. I will try scrubbing it a bit and see if gets to acceptable smoothness.

Regarding the exterior door if I don't want to replace the whole door what are my options ? Is there a way to patch/fix this dryrot ?

https://www.dropbox.com/sc/c7ffu7mbc...IMG_1917_l.JPG

I am a new homeowner and trying to learn things slowly. Replacing the door is probably out of my league for now.
 
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Old 12-23-13, 03:40 PM
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You can replace that piece of casing, the biggest thing is finding the same profile. It's probably 'brick mold' but I couldn't tell because of the shape it's in. You might consider replacing all 3 pieces with PVC brick mold [it will never rot] If you stick with wood, I'd prime the bottom edge and up the backside a little [before installing] to give it extra protection.
 
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Old 12-23-13, 04:56 PM
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Cool I will go to Home Depot to search for a PVC molding tonight. Is removing a molding as simple as cutting the caulking and using a hammer to pry the molding out or is there anything else that I am missing ?
 
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Old 12-24-13, 02:33 AM
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Instead of using the claw end of the hammer, I'd start with a stiff putty knife or basically anything that you can get behind the wood to pry it off.... but yes, it's just on there with nails with caulk around the edges.
 
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Old 12-25-13, 04:09 AM
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not certain anyone answered your ? nor if you're still waiting but someone else may read & wonder,,, how thick is the coating ? w/o spending $$ on the instrument used to measure film thickness, mark off the sq footage the directions give you per gal - VOILA !!!!!!!! can't go wrong that way !
 
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Old 12-25-13, 04:25 AM
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I've always just eyeballed it. I prefer to apply coatings liberally; it covers better, last longer and extra paint acts as a lubricrant making the brush/roller work easier. The few times that I've had a tech come in behind me and measure the film thickness - it was never shy

Generally the sq footage stated on the label is for a slick sealed substrate. Porous and/or rough texture will require more coating per sq ft.
 
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Old 12-27-13, 03:53 AM
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we don't disagree but we have related work experience - op's diy
 
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