Whitewashing/Milk Paint question - will this lime work?

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Old 01-11-14, 06:55 PM
K
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Question Whitewashing/Milk Paint question - will this lime work?

Anybody have any experience making whitewash or milk paint?

My online research told me to use quick lime, hydrated lime, type S lime, mason's lime, high calcium lime, or lime putty. It warned against ag lime though. I have called 10 local hardware/building centers and can only find hydrated horticultural lime. Not sure where that falls.

I got a bag of Hoffman's hydrated horticultural lime. From their website (goodearth.org):
"What is the difference between Hoffman Hydrated Lime and dolomitic lime and what is it used for ?

Hydrated lime (calcium hydroxide) has more neutralizing power than the more common dolomitic (calcium-magnesium carbonate) limestone. Dolomitic lime is usually sold in 40-50lb. Bags vs. the small bag of Hydrated lime. This means that for gardening purposes, you should apply about two-thirds the recommended amount of Hydrated lime. Itís main usage is to alter soil pH."
So from that I figure it's calcium hydroxide. Can anybody tell me whether that is one of the types that will work for milk paint? I never was very good at chemistry!

Appreciate any help!
Thanks!
Kimberly
 
  #2  
Old 01-14-14, 02:45 PM
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Welcome to the forums Kimberly!

Unfortunately it looks like no one here has an answer for you While I learned a little about white wash and milk paint back when I was an apprentice - that was a long time ago.
 
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Old 01-20-14, 11:03 AM
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Thanks for the reply Mark.
Apparently the generation who used this stuff has either all died out or not taken well to the internet.

Just in case anybody else looking for answers finds this post I'll share my experience.
I went ahead and mixed up the milk paint using the Hoffman's horticultural lime and started painting. The first bit went really well. It was going on clear and drying white, just as I expected.
Three coats gave me an opaque finish.

I had to take a break to make supper and came back later in the evening to continue painting only to find that it was no longer drying opaque. o.O Weird. I stirred and stirred with no change.
Six coats was now giving less coverage than one coat when I made the paint. It dries clear now.

So, I'm going to hazard a guess that the Hoffman's isn't the right kind of lime?
Or maybe there should be warnings about painting really fast? LOL
 
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Old 01-20-14, 02:33 PM
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It could be that the mix has a set work time and changes chemically after a certain period of time.
 
  #5  
Old 01-28-14, 05:22 AM
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Whitewash

Kim, any decent masonry supply store should have the hydrated lime that you need. It is used in plastering and masonry work such as brick and stone mortar.

I made some up last summer to coat the stone wall foundations at a restoration project I am working on. As you found, the material goes on relatively clear and after a few coats provides a nice opaque to solid white color. I used salt in my mix as well as the lime as this provides an antiseptic and more reflective surface.

Stop at any construction site where you see masons working and they should be able to direct you to a supplier.
 
 

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