Fixing Uneven Textures on Hardboard before Painting

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Old 01-14-14, 12:22 PM
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Fixing Uneven Textures on Hardboard before Painting

Hello,

I am currently in the process of painting a pantry style cabinet which will be placed in our master bathroom for storage.

I purchased one of the unfinished 24 inch cabinets at a local big box store and brought it home. Since I was going to be painting it instead of staining it, I opted to use hardboard for the two side panels instead of an oak veneer.

I attached the hardboard using wood glue and small brads from my finish nailer. Once it was attached and allowed to set, I began prepping for paint.

There were a few small indentations in the hardboard from the nailer, as well as some scratches where I ran my router over the hardboard with a flush cut bit to trim the hardboard.

I tried sanding with some 120 grit paper and a mouse sander. That helped with the groves but the deeper ones remained. I then filled the grooves as well as the indentations with latex based wood filler.

Once the wood filler was dry, I again sanded the area with the mouse and 120 grit paper. I tried to feather out the areas the best that I could.

After I completed the sanding, I wiped the surface down with a damp cloth and allowed it to dry before priming.

I used an oil based gray tinted primer and applied the first coat yesterday evening. As the primer dried, I was able to clearly see every place I put the wood filler. The texture is different than the surrounding surface.

Is there anything I can do to help make these disappear, especially since I've already applied one coat of primer? I was thinking that lightly sanding the entire surface in an attempt to get a uniform texture and then applying a second, and possible third, coat of primer would help, but before I proceed I wanted to check with some of the fine people here at the forums.

I appreciate any information you may be able to provide. My wife has been looking forward to this cabinet for quite some time and I want it to look its best.

Thank You
 
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Old 01-14-14, 12:44 PM
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Wait for the Pro painters....but here's a couple of things I have read here.

Primer isn't designed to cover, it's designed to provide a good bond. Since you say the texture and not the color, that may not apply.

I've also read than you can skim the wood with joint compound then mostly sand it off. That can seal and fill the wood and provide a smooth surface.

Like I said...wait for the Pro's.
 
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Old 01-14-14, 02:40 PM
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What kind of texture? would it show up in a pic? http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html

As Vic stated, you can apply an ultra thin coat of j/c and then sand it all off. What remains should make everything smooth. You would then need to reprime. What do you intend to use for a top coat? Oil base enamel will highlight any defects in the wood, latex and/or waterborne enamels are a little more forgiving but it is best to get it right before applying the finish paint.
 
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Old 01-14-14, 02:49 PM
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Hello

I will get a few photos of it taken this evening. Basically, you can see the spots where the wood filler was applied. Since the hardboard doesn't have a grain, and sanding the wood filler left small scratches in the filler, the areas where the filler was applied really stand out.

Hopefully I'll be able to get the filler spots to show up in a picture.

The finish coat is going to be a latex furniture paint. Black in color with a flat finish. Figured I'd spray a coat or two of satin clear coat once finished to help protect it. I wanted satin black but its no longer carried at our local big box store.

Thanks for the great replies so far.
 
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Old 01-14-14, 03:35 PM
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If it's just sanding scratches, a couple of coats of paint [sanding lightly between coats] should take care of them. What kind of sprayer are you going to use? .... or are you using a rattle can? Paint in aerosol cans has to be drastically thinned in order to come out the little tip. You'll probably get a better finish using a brush or roller than you will with a rattle can - it's too hard to get a thick enough coat of paint with an aerosol can.

all but forgot welcome to the forums!
 
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Old 01-14-14, 03:45 PM
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I'm having a real reading comprehension issue today. You said hardBOARD...I read hardWOOD. That's a different animal all together. Hardboard = compressed masonite ( basically pegboard material) in my mind.

Could you clarify for me since I'm apparently mentally dense today EXACTLY what you mean by hardboard?

I don't know whether the Pro's will agree...but maybe a finer grit would help. Not normally recommended for wood, but we had entire walls of it in some buildings I managed and it was a royal PITA for everything from repairs to painting.
 
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Old 01-14-14, 03:49 PM
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I comprehended the hardboard part but most have an ultra slick finish. I'm having a hard time understanding the texture unless the hardboard was installed backwards.
 
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Old 01-14-14, 03:53 PM
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Post 4 Mark...the texture/scratch issues are mostly in the filler from what I can tell.

Pics will tell the story.
 
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Old 01-14-14, 03:57 PM
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In that case, a light sanding of a good heavy coat of primer should get rid of the scratches.
 
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Old 01-15-14, 12:41 AM
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I got pictures taken this evening and will post them in the morning when I get off work.

To clear up the confusion, I used 1/8" hardboard (like pegboard is made from) on the sides of the cabinet. I brushed the oil based primer on and am planning on using a finish roller to roll on the black paint. I was planning on using rattle can clear coat as the finish coat. Everything else will be brushed / rolled.


Hopefully the pictures will show what is going on. I didn't have time to get them posted before I had to leave for work tonight.


As far as sanding the entire surface, should I do that by hand? If a power sander is acceptable, which type should I be using (Mouse, Belt, etc) ?

thanks for all the replies so far. I do appreciate them.
 
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Old 01-15-14, 04:01 AM
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It's easy to sand thru the factory finish of hardboard so I'd be inclined to sand by hand using 180 or 220 grit sandpaper. You do not want to use a belt sander!!
 
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Old 01-15-14, 07:45 AM
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Pictures

Attached are three pictures that were taken yesterday evening of the cabinet. I've had to resize them to meet forum guidelines, but can provide the full size pictures if needed. I could upload them to someplace like shutterfly or imgshack.

One of the photos shows the texture difference I was talking about rather clearly, the others just show that there are several places along the side panel that have similar texture differences.

Thanks
 
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Old 01-15-14, 12:49 PM
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I'm a little confused by the texture shown in the middle pic but I'd be inclined to sand the entire piece with 180 or 220 and then either apply another coat of primer or a coat of finish and then reevaluate how it looks. There is a good chance that a rolled on coat of paint will hide the 'texture' difference.
 
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Old 01-19-14, 05:38 PM
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I wanted to stop back in and say thank you for the great advice I received here. Today it was warm enough to work in the garage, so I started out by sanding the entire surface with 120 grit sandpaper. Afterwards, I wiped all the dust off with a damp cloth, allowed it to dry, and hit it again with 220 grit paper.

After wiping the remaining dust off, I once again allowed it to dry and then gave it a fresh coat of primer. While I still know where the wood filler spots are, they no longer appear as a difference in finished texture.

I am currently waiting on the primer to dry... Should be finished in another hour or so. And I will be ready to put on the first coat of black finish with a fine finish foam roller.

I will be sure to post pictures once I have this completed.
 
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Old 01-20-14, 03:43 AM
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Thanks for the update be sure to give the primer plenty of time to dry before applying the top coat!
 
 

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