Anyone Else Having Troubles With Valspar Interior Signature Paint?

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Old 01-15-14, 10:50 AM
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Anyone Else Having Troubles With Valspar Interior Signature Paint?

I have had nothing but trouble with Valspar's Interior Signature Paint.

The paint is not covering in one coat like it's suppose to going from
yellow to a tan & a light brown color.

With a lot of other interior paint's I've not had this much trouble.

I have to put an extra heavy coat on & cannot seem to get the paint
to blend in when I go a little dry with the roller.

The sheen like semi-gloss or satin is not the best & there's areas
on the wall where the sheen is not all uniform & when I try and
touch up the sheen is much better & noticeable than the rest of
the wall, I've had to re-paint three wall's already.

Is there a reasonable priced interior paint besides the $40 a gallon
paint like Sherwin-Williams that would not be so troublesome to work
with that would be better I'm painting a church.
 
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Old 01-15-14, 12:51 PM
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I rarely use any paint from the big box store. I've had good results using SWP's ProMar 200. It's their best contractor's grade. I'm not sure what the current cost is, you'd have to call and find out.

Enamels don't always touch up well and if the underlying coat doesn't have good coverage, then touch up will always show
 
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Old 01-15-14, 03:21 PM
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I also have had problems with Velspar paint. I bought what I thought was satin and it turned out as a semi-gloss even though Lowes told me it was mixed properly.

I will only use Dutchboy paint (also made by SWP).

BTW...It took a phone call to corparate headquarters to get satisfaction and my money back! Go figure!

I have since taken on a part time job in a local home improvement store that in fact happens to sell Ducthboy and P&L (both SWP). We will nearly take back any paint if the customer is not satitisfied. I will go so far as to ask the customer if he still likes the color after I mix it. If not I have and can re-mix (depending on circumstances).
 
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Old 01-16-14, 04:18 AM
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I don't know why but there isn't an industry standard when it comes to sheen. Different brands and sometimes different lines from the same manufacture will have different sheen levels. Unless using the same brand/line of paint, the sheen stated on the label should be considered an approximate sheen level. If I remember correctly, it states on the label the light refraction level at a specified angle which would be about the only way to know in advance what the true sheen level is.

An inadequately sealed [primed or painted] substrate and/or insufficient coverage won't allow the true sheen level to be shown.
 
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Old 01-16-14, 05:27 AM
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Different brands and sometimes different lines from the same manufacture will have different sheen levels.
Good point mrksr. Also I will advise a customer to bring his/her paint chip of choice to the front window prior to my mixing it so they will see a what the color will be like in natural light vs our harsh florescent light. One of my big gripes in our store and others is the lack of a "light box" which can be used to put a paint chip in and see it under different lighting . This is specially a problem with the newer CFL and LED bulbs on the market. Most people don't know or want to learn about lumens and kalvin color of the new lighting standards.
 
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Old 01-16-14, 05:33 AM
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I got a lesson in how light affects the perceived color over 40 yrs ago. I painted my parents living and dining rm with a bunch of scrap paint mixed together. Dependent on the lighting [sunshine, clouds or artificial light] the paint had a gold, yellow or green cast. The sheen or how the paint reflects light adds to the 'color change' effect.

Also paint touch ups always show but along with coverage - lighting, angle of sight and sheen determine how easy/hard they are to spot.
 
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Old 01-16-14, 04:41 PM
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If your house has not been painted in a while, then the walls are what we call "thirsty". They suck up paint fast and need a second coat to get a good finished coat to sit on top of the wall and not inside the wall. In those situations, it is best to prime the walls first to satisfy the "thirst" the walls have, then paint. I do not ever quote one coat of paint. I always quote at least two finish coats. Don't care how good you are, "holidays" in the paint happen and you need to over paint to fill in the voids. One coat prime and paint all in one is a marketing gimmick that preys on your desire to just get it done.

The issue of inconsistent sheen has to do with what is called "Flashing". Eggshell is notorious for flashing. To prevent flashing, you need to finish every stroke in the same direction, either up or down with the roller. Mamby pamby random strokes with the roller in every which way direction will cause a terrible finish with some paints and sheen's. However, in your case, I would peg the issue with trying to one coat a wall that needs more than one coat.
 
 

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