Painting an exterior light post


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Old 01-23-14, 08:59 AM
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Painting an exterior light post

I want to paint an exterior light post from the grey color to a black color to match the new light head we are putting on. What kind of paint is recommended to withstand the outside conditions and last for years? What process would you use to paint it?

Current light post
Name:  Light post.jpg
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New light head
Savannah 1-Light 19" Black Outdoor Post Light Head at Menards
 

Last edited by FireEMSPolice; 01-23-14 at 09:17 AM.
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Old 01-23-14, 11:43 AM
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What material is the post constructed of? steel? pvc? something else?

For a lasting job I'd shy away from paint in aerosol cans. The contents are drastically thinned so it will atomize out of the little tip, the results are a thin film of paint that typically doesn't weather very long. Generally the heavier the coat of paint, the longer it will wear. What type of paint to use will depend on what material the post is constructed of.
 
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Old 01-31-14, 04:09 PM
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Its a metal light post. What do I use to make it last?
 
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Old 02-01-14, 03:55 AM
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Is it steel? or aluminum?

For steel, I'd use an oil base exterior enamel. Rustoleum would work although I'm not sure how fade resistant their coatings are. Your local paint store should have a quart of something better. Exterior latex house paint is fine for aluminum.

Assuming you don't have the spray equipment, you can still get a nice job with a brush. Thin the paint about 5% or so and apply it with a natural bristle brush. If it takes 2 coats, sanding between the coats will help to eliminate or reduce the brush marks along with promoting good adhesion.
 
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Old 02-01-14, 02:17 PM
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It also has a little bit of rust on it in spots
 
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Old 02-01-14, 02:19 PM
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I'd sand and prime those areas first!
 
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Old 02-21-14, 05:30 PM
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I should add that the post has some rust on it. Any ideas on how to deal with that prior to painting?


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Old 02-22-14, 04:05 AM
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If feasible, sand all the rust down to shiny metal and then apply a rust inhibitive primer. Otherwise sand it the best you can and then apply the primer.

I assume you know that it's best to wait until the weather gets warmer. While you can fudge some, paint does best when the air and substrate temps are 50 degrees and rising. The drying time of oil base primer/paint can slow down or even stop when the temps get too cold.
 
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Old 02-22-14, 08:23 AM
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Yea, these Ohio winters suck..lol..so I am just trying to get a Spring project lined up. I definitely dont like working outdoors in the winter.

Any particular grit sandpaper I should use to sand this down to the bare shiny metal?
 
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Old 02-22-14, 02:48 PM
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The rougher the grit, the quicker it will sand although with a coarse grit you'd likely need to finish up with a finer grit. I'd start with 80 grit and see how it does. 120-150 grit should be fine for a brushed on finish, 220 grit if it's a sprayed finish.
 
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Old 02-23-14, 04:57 PM
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I will paint with a brush so I will use 120-150 grit. I dont want to spray it because it does thin out. I want something that will last. I dont feel like doing this every year...lol.
 
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Old 04-27-14, 11:19 AM
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Thanks for all the help folks! I think it turned out great!
 
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Old 04-28-14, 03:17 AM
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Glad to hear it
 
 

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