Painting a pocket door without removing it


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Old 03-09-14, 07:22 AM
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Painting a pocket door without removing it

Is it possible to paint a pocket door without removing it? If so, how?
 
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Old 03-09-14, 07:30 AM
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It's not real easy, since the door usually just barely goes behind the stops on the side... it would make that side pretty hard to paint. But I've seen guys try rather than monkey with the trim and door. Biggest reason to take the door off is so that you can roll or spray it separately, and get in and paint the sides of the stops that you can see when the door is fully open. If you paint it while it's on the jamb you are probably going to have lots of brush strokes on the door.

Most pocket doors with Johnson hardware are "supposed" to have a piece of trim on top (on at least ONE side of the top) that is not nailed to the casing. Often it's held on by screws so that you can get to the brackets on top if you need to adjust or remove the door. But half the time the carpenters either don't know the procedure or don't care since they probably won't be the one struggling to remove the door later.
 
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Old 03-09-14, 08:21 AM
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I've painted 100's of them after they were installed. You do need to be fairly fast, on a panel door paint all the panels first then the side that goes into the wall. You'd then open the door to give you access to the rest. On a flat slab door you just paint that edge first and then open it slightly to do the rest. Usually it's best to keep the door open as far as possible until the paint dries. Often there are 'things' in the pocket that can attach to or even rub the wet paint.
 
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Old 03-09-14, 11:24 AM
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Marksr, I guess I don't understand your directions. Sorry.

Also, do I need to sand the door? It's just a flat slab.
 
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Old 03-10-14, 01:32 AM
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Also, what grit sand paper should I use?
 
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Old 03-10-14, 04:39 AM
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120 grit is a good all around grit to use prior to painting. 150 or 180 grit will work if the substrate is already smooth, no need for anything finer.

You have to have the door completely shut [as far out of the wall as it will go] you'd then paint a stripe or two along the part of the door that goes in the wall first, then you push the door into the wall a little and paint the rest of the door. You need to be fast enough to keep a wet edge. If you roll the door just bring your cut in area out a little further. Hope I made more sense this time.
 
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Old 03-11-14, 06:19 PM
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That makes a little more sense. Thanks!

I planned to close it, start at the back edge (part going in the wall first) then work my way forward. Should I be worried opening the door in to the wall with wet paint?
 
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Old 03-11-14, 06:41 PM
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Not if you still have plastic guides on the bottom to keep it centered.
 
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Old 03-30-14, 11:54 AM
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Fire, reread what marksr posted as that's the best (professional painter) way. Make sure you understand what was posted, where you start painting, being quick etc. Probably a lot easier for guys like marksr and myself. Anything is easy if you've done it hundreds of times. And yes. you should be worried about closing the door after painting. Most of the time, you have to close it enough to get past the door after you've painted the inside (first side) to get to the outside of the door and paint the last side (which you've already painted the 'style' side that goes into the wall first).
Now that I've written that, I understand how hard it is to convey! lol I'm going to make a video on just that, 'How to paint a pocket door'!

All the best with your door

Rickaroonie

Good luck
 
 

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